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'Dear esteemed author…'

So-called predatory publishers regularly approach researchers via email to solicit manuscripts and conference papers. With the emphasis on publishing as a measure of academic success still strong it can be easy to give in to temptation and flattery but this can do more harm than good to a future career.

This session will look at the problem of predatory publishers using case studies. Attendees will be given tips on how to spot a predatory publisher or conference and the best advice to offer if one of their researchers has been approached.

Are your students confused by copyright? Do you struggle to find the answers to their questions? You are not alone!

This final session of our Librarian Toolkit series on helping researchers to publish, this workshop will deal with common copyright questions which arise during the publication process. From including copyrighted work in a thesis to sharing published work on social networks copyright is a complex minefield and it can be hard to know where to start when giving advice.

This session for librarians will equip attendees with knowledge about third party copyright, making work available open access and how researchers can share their work legally online.

David Carr and Robert Kiley from the Wellcome Trust are coming to Cambridge to talk with researchers about the Trust’s policy on data, software and materials management and sharing, which was released in July 2017. They will give short talks about the extended requirements for sharing all research outputs and an update on how their policy on open research has been working. Afterwards you will have the opportunity to ask them any questions you might have.

This event will be held in the Gurdon Institute tea-room.

Advertised on behalf of ReproducibiliTea, the Open Science Journal Club in the Department of Psychology

The Open Science Journal Club invites anyone interested in Open Research to join this lunchtime session, where Dav Clark will introduce Gigantum, a free open source tool designed to streamline reproducible and collaborative data science. Gigantum aims to bring together complex tools, workflows and community approaches that enable exciting research collaborations and also enable others to evaluate and build on your work.

The session will introduce the Gigantum Client, an MIT licensed web application that runs locally, simplifying and automating tools like Docker, Git, and launching environments like JupyterLab. Dav will also describe paid services hosted by Gigantum that enable single-click publication and collaboration from the Client. You will learn about versioning and collaboration features, how to easily move work between local resources and the cloud, as well as new approaches to creating and managing scientific datasets. There will also be the chance to go under the hood to show how sophisticated users (e.g., Research Software Engineers, Data Librarians, etc.) can create customized data science environments that are easy to distribute, and are accessible to users with diverse skill sets.

All welcome - if you aren't a member of the Department of Psychology, please meet at the Department Reception by 12.55 and Ben Farrar will show you to the Nick Macintosh Seminar Room (a second escort will check at 1pm for latecomers!).

This session will include a hands-on demo, so please bring your laptops. You may bring your lunch if you wish, and Dav is happy to join participants for lunch afterwards.

Introduction to Programming: Workshop new Thu 15 Dec 2016   09:00 Finished
  • Do you use data in your research, or do you provide research support to those who do?
  • Would you like to learn basic programming skills to program your own models and applications?

There is more to programming than simply writing lines of code. This free workshop will provide you with a basic set of skills to make the coding process more effective, less error prone and more maintainable.

This workshop is intended for those looking to obtain a basic understanding of the approach to be taken when designing a program as well as actually writing small programs to solve specific problems. It is designed for those with no prior experience of programming.

It is organised by the Office of Scholarly Communication and The Betty and Gordon Moore Library, and delivered by Peter Smyth (Research Associate) and Chris Park (Data Scientist) from the UK Data Service.

Is Open Research really changing the world? new Thu 25 Oct 2018   18:00 Finished

Much research claims to benefit communities globally but are research outputs really available to everyone, even if they are made open access?

Join us on a world tour to discover what is possible when researchers and governments make their research outputs available openly. What kind of impact do they have outside the academy – and outside the global north? What more can we do to make these outputs useful to innovators and to those researching outside the academic sector?

Everyone is welcome to attend this free event: visit our booking page.

  • Where should you publish your research?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a journal for your work?
  • How do you respond to reviewers?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess a journal - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • What happens during peer-review

Some learned societies are increasingly dependent on publishing revenues, yet as open access becomes the new normal, researchers and librarians alike are questioning expensive subscription and publishing deals.

The Office of Scholarly Communication presents a panel debate for Open Access Week 2018 and Cambridge Festival of Ideas 2018. Join representatives from learned societies in the arts and sciences, including the Royal Society, the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Royal Historical Society, in conversation with their members within the University of Cambridge to ask ‘what is a learned society in the 21st century?’ How can the societies sustain their place in the academic landscape and answer the challenges created by open access requirements?

Everyone is welcome to attend this free event: visit our booking page.

The Office of Scholarly Communication invites you to join Naomi Penfold of ASAPbio for an hour of relaxed, small group discussions on how and why publishing is changing to become more transparent, and what this means for you.

Bring your lunch and join a 'discussion table' to explore questions such as...

  • why change academic publishing?
  • who and what is transparency good for?
  • what should we not change?
  • what are preprints and why bother?
  • where does peer review fit in?

ASAPbio is a scientist-driven non-profit ensuring the voices of science and the scientist are represented in innovation to improve transparency in life science communication.

This event is open to all, although will be of particular relevance to those in biomedical and life sciences.

Librarians are used to dealing with data in all its forms but sometimes researchers aren't so sure. Many funders now require evidence from the researcher of how they plan to manage the data they use and collect during the research process and this often has to be tailored to specific guidelines. This presents a great opportunity for library staff to work with the research community but how do they get started?

Join the OSC to learn more about what a data management plan is, why they are necessary, the different information needed, how to complete one and how to support someone in completing theirs. This interactive train-the-trainer workshop will include a mix of presentations and activities with a chance to put your new knowledge into practice.

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Feeling lost in getting started on data management?

Attend the workshop to get inspired and started on how to structure, backup and describe your data.

This workshop (for students in the area of physical and human geography, as well as STEM subjects generally) will work through the challenges around managing research data as well as the benefits of working reproducibly. Participants will be provided with guidance and resources on how to effectively manage projects and avoid data loss throughout the research process.

You will hear of what can happen if researchers do not manage their data well as well as what happens to research data after the end of a project, such as how to share and store data in a long-term and sustainable way. It is never too early to start thinking about these things, so get a head start on your research data management practices now!

Department of Geography, Seminar Room

Paola Quattroni from Cancer Research UK coming to run a workshop on 11th May.

This is a really good opportunity to influence the Cancer Research UK data policy and give feedback to your funder about the changes you would like to see. Paola will give a short talk and then the majority of the workshop will be given over to discussions and opportunities for researchers to feedback their experiences, problems and suggested solutions to enable more data sharing. As well as discussing data sharing Paola will also bring some data management plans so researchers can find out more about what they should and should not be putting in their grant applications.

Solving the problem of Open Access or causing more trouble?

Open Access can be hard to understand at the best of times but one term that causes particular confusion is ‘mirror journals’. Promoted as one way of solving the problem of a lack of publisher interest in Open Access, these titles are appearing in every discipline but what are they?

Join the OSC for this information webinar to find out all about mirror journals, their history, the problems they can solve and those that they can potentially cause!

Are the researchers in your department confused about what they need to do about Open Access?

This support session will equip you to help them understand:

  • what Open Access policies actually mean for researchers across the disciplines
  • what they are required to do in order for their research to be eligible for REF 2021

Open Access can be a confusing topic for researchers and they will often turn to those within their department for answers. These interactive sessions will help those with these responsibilities to guide researchers through the process of making their research available.

Each session will begin with a short presentation introducing Open Access followed by a chance for attendees to ask questions on issues of local relevance.

Note that this session is targeted towards those supporting the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics although those from other disciplines are also welcome to attend

Join the OSC for a discussion of Open Access issues relevant to HASS librarians

The Open Access message has been geared towards sharing academic outputs like journal articles and their underlying data as well as being mandated by funders but how do you promote Open Access if none of these areas apply to your work?

This final webinar in our "Librarian Toolkit" series on Open Access will address Open Access from the perspective of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences librarians and cover topics such as Open Access monographs, the implications of not having a funder and places to share your work.

Open Access Update 2018 (Webinar for librarians) new Thu 3 May 2018   12:30 Finished

What's new in Open Access for 2018?

Open Access is a fast moving area but it can be hard to find the time to keep up. This webinar on Open Access offers a brief update on the biggest changes both within Cambridge and the wider world in the last year.

Open Access Update 2019 (for librarians) new Wed 17 Jul 2019   12:00 [Places]

What’s new in Open Access for 2019?

Open Access is a fast moving area but it can be hard to find time to keep up with the latest developments. This session offers a brief update on the biggest changes both within Cambridge and the wider world in the last year.

Join us for the fourth in our series exploring resources to help with the process of publishing your research in STEM disciplines - from recording observations to editing to peer review.

This session offers the chance to learn about available tools and options in publishing and reviewing, and ask questions of the experts.

Featuring contributions from:

  • independent and not-for-profit media outlet The Conversation (Miriam Frankel)
  • local solutions with Cambridge University Press (Chris Harrison)
  • Aperta and changing the way we publish with PLOS (Nicola Stead)
  • Open Access with Scholastica (Brian Cody)

and more!

Morning refreshments and lunch will be provided, during which time you can speak to providers for information and user support.

We will be recording and sharing these presentations for all those who are unable to attend on the day.

You can find a programme for this event here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1j07XgHK5MOfLcvVZiIf3xnoGI0EcgJr1hRWIaO0AUDI/edit?usp=sharing

Thanks to PLOS for their sponsorship of this event.

Join the OSC for an introduction to Open Access

Open Access can be complicated, especially when you're dealing with researchers from across disciplines. This introductory session on Open Access is specifically tailored to the needs of Cambridge college library staff working with a range of different users although anyone wanting a refresher on Open Access is welcome to attend.

The first in our "Librarian Toolkit" webinar series on Open Access will cover topics such as what Open Access is, why it's important and how college librarians can support their users in sharing their work.

Paywall the Movie: lunchtime screening new Fri 26 Oct 2018   12:00 Finished

The OSC is delighted to bring you a lunchtime screening of the documentary that has taken Open Access issues to the big screen.

Paywall: The Business of Scholarship is a documentary which focuses on the need for open access to research and science, questions the rationale behind the $25.2 billion a year that flows into for-profit academic publishers, examines the 35-40% profit margin associated with the top academic publisher Elsevier and looks at how that profit margin is often greater than some of the most profitable tech companies like Apple, Facebook and Google.

Bring your lunch and enjoy some popcorn!

Everyone is welcome to attend this free event: visit our booking page.

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics.

Explore:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • What publishing format should you choose?

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess the appropriateness of a journal for your research - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • How you can use other people’s copyrighted material
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • What publishing format should you choose?

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess the appropriateness of a journal for your research - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • How you can use other people’s copyrighted material
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