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10 matching courses
Courses per page: 10 | 25 | 50 | 100


  • Where should you publish your monograph or book chapter?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a publisher for your work?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Turning your thesis into a monograph
  • Choosing a publisher
  • Understanding the publication process

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Copyright transfer agreements
  • Creative Commons
  • 3rd party copyright
  • Open Access publisher requirements

The session will start with a 40 minute presentation, after which the time is open for you to raise questions and discuss issues you have encountered.

If you have recently started receiving peer reviews, or would like to become a reviewer, this is an unmissable chance to pick up tips and best practices for responding to reviews, being noticed as a reviewer, getting your review done, and getting credit for your work

The Office of Scholarly Communication invites you to an essential introduction to Peer Review.

You'll learn...

  • how to make the most of the peer review process
  • how to increase the chance of being asked to review
  • how to get ready to review and be recognized for your work
  • how to write the feedback you wish you'd received.

FAIR data are those that are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. Sounds simple enough, but what do each of these terms mean in a practical sense and how can your researchers tell if their research data is FAIR?

The Research Data Team at the Office of Scholarly Communication join forces with FOSTER Open Science to offer this practical course to help you get to grips with the key principles and consider how you can help your researchers make their data FAIRer.

Course commences Monday 4 March: book your place by Thursday 28 February.

This three-week, self-paced course will:

  • introduce you to the key terms and explain what they mean in a practical sense
  • demonstrate how data management planning can help to make data FAIR from the very start of research projects
  • show you how you can use freely available tools to help assess the FAIRness of data
  • provide you with the chance to FAIRify a sample dataset from the Apollo repository, and get feedback from your peers on its potential reusabilty.

The course consists of an online module followed by two short exercises (see below for details). During this time, participants will need to allocate between 2-4 hours to complete all of the course tasks. Upon successful completion of the course, participants will be awarded with a 'FAIR Data Assessor' badge.

You are then invited to attend a workshop on Monday 25 March with teams from FOSTER Open Science and the Office of Scholarly Communication to discuss your experiences in assessing the FAIRness of your chosen dataset, including any problems you encountered. We will also discuss guidelines on how to best support researchers in making their data FAIR. Find further details here about How FAIR is that research data?: a workshop (for research support staff including librarians and administrators in all disciplines).

The course is open to any staff involved in supporting researchers.

FAIR data are those that are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. Sounds simple enough, but what do each of these terms mean in a practical sense and how can you tell if your own research data is FAIR?

The Research Data Team at the Office of Scholarly Communication join forces with FOSTER Open Science to offer this practical course to help you get to grips with the key principles and consider how you can start to make your own data FAIRer.

Course commences Monday 4 March: book your place by Thursday 28 February.

This three-week, self-paced course will:

  • introduce you to the key terms and explain what they mean in a practical sense
  • demonstrate how data management planning can help to make data FAIR from the very start of research projects
  • show you how you can use freely available tools to help assess the FAIRness of data
  • provide you with the chance to FAIRify your own data, or a sample dataset from the Apollo repository, and get feedback from your peers on its potential reusabilty.

The course consists of an online module followed by two short exercises (see below for details). During this time, participants will need to allocate between 2-4 hours to complete all of the course tasks. Upon successful completion of the course, participants will be awarded with a 'FAIR Data Assessor' badge.

You are then invited to attend a workshop on Monday 25 March with FOSTER and the Research Data Team from the Office of Scholarly Communication to discuss your experiences in assessing the FAIRness of your data, including any problems you encountered. You are welcome to bring examples of your data to this session to further develop your skills, or try your hand at FAIRifying more example datasets from Apollo. Find further details here about How FAIR is your research data?: a workshop (for researchers and postgraduate students in all disciplines).

The course is open to researchers and postgraduate students in all disciplines - arts, humanities and social sciences as well as sciences, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine.

Solving the problem of Open Access or causing more trouble?

Open Access can be hard to understand at the best of times but one term that causes particular confusion is ‘mirror journals’. Promoted as one way of solving the problem of a lack of publisher interest in Open Access, these titles are appearing in every discipline but what are they?

Join the OSC for this information webinar to find out all about mirror journals, their history, the problems they can solve and those that they can potentially cause!

Open Access Update 2019 (for librarians) new Wed 17 Jul 2019   12:00 [Places]

What’s new in Open Access for 2019?

Open Access is a fast moving area but it can be hard to find time to keep up with the latest developments. This session offers a brief update on the biggest changes both within Cambridge and the wider world in the last year.

This course answers all the questions that come up when you start to publish your research in academic journals. It will be a fast-paced overview of the publishing process, from choosing a journal to dealing with peer-review. We will also explore some recent developments in the publishing landscape: the preregistration of trials and preprints. By the end of the session, publishing will seem less daunting and you will be able to avoid of common pitfalls.

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research

Many researchers consider publishing a book, often in the form of a monograph, and the process can be daunting the first time around. You will get the starter-kit to get your idea off the ground, with a collection of tips and tools to make your life easier. By the end of the session, you'll have the basic knowledge -and more importantly the confidence- to take your publishing project further.