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Social Sciences Research Methods Centre course timetable

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Tue 26 Sep – Mon 30 Oct

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Wednesday 4 October

16:00
SSRMC Student Induction Lecture [Open] 16:00 - 17:00 Lady Mitchell Hall

This event details how the SSRMC works, more about the modules we offer, and everything you need to know about making a booking.

NB. ALL STUDENTS WISHING TO TAKE SSRMC COURSES THIS YEAR ARE EXPECTED TO ATTEND THIS INDUCTION SESSION

Monday 9 October

10:00
Practical introduction to MATLAB Programming new (1 of 4) Not bookable 10:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This is an Open Access module, so please read the course description carefully before making a booking, and be advised that spaces may be limited.

The course focuses on practical hands-on variable handling and programming implementation rather than on theory. This course is intended for those who have never programmed before including those who only call/run Matlab scripts but are not familiar with how code works and how matrices are handled in Matlab. (Note that calling a couple of scripts is not 'real' programming.)

More information on the course can be found, here: http://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/grads/grads/pg-prog/programming#section-0

14:00
Practical introduction to MATLAB Programming new (2 of 4) Not bookable 14:00 - 16:00 Nick Mackintosh Seminar Room, Department of Psychology

This is an Open Access module, so please read the course description carefully before making a booking, and be advised that spaces may be limited.

The course focuses on practical hands-on variable handling and programming implementation rather than on theory. This course is intended for those who have never programmed before including those who only call/run Matlab scripts but are not familiar with how code works and how matrices are handled in Matlab. (Note that calling a couple of scripts is not 'real' programming.)

More information on the course can be found, here: http://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/grads/grads/pg-prog/programming#section-0

Tuesday 10 October

10:00
Practical introduction to MATLAB Programming new (3 of 4) Not bookable 10:00 - 12:00 New Museums Site, Hopkinson Lecture Theatre

This is an Open Access module, so please read the course description carefully before making a booking, and be advised that spaces may be limited.

The course focuses on practical hands-on variable handling and programming implementation rather than on theory. This course is intended for those who have never programmed before including those who only call/run Matlab scripts but are not familiar with how code works and how matrices are handled in Matlab. (Note that calling a couple of scripts is not 'real' programming.)

More information on the course can be found, here: http://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/grads/grads/pg-prog/programming#section-0

14:00
Practical introduction to MATLAB Programming new (4 of 4) Not bookable 14:00 - 16:00 Nick Mackintosh Seminar Room, Department of Psychology

This is an Open Access module, so please read the course description carefully before making a booking, and be advised that spaces may be limited.

The course focuses on practical hands-on variable handling and programming implementation rather than on theory. This course is intended for those who have never programmed before including those who only call/run Matlab scripts but are not familiar with how code works and how matrices are handled in Matlab. (Note that calling a couple of scripts is not 'real' programming.)

More information on the course can be found, here: http://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/grads/grads/pg-prog/programming#section-0

16:00
Comparative Historical Methods (1 of 4) Not bookable 16:00 - 17:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

These four sessions will introduce students to comparative historical research methods, emphasizing their qualitative dimensions. In the first session, we will analyze some contemporary classics within this genre. In the second and third sessions, we will review and distinguish among a variety of intellectual justifications for this genre as a methodology. In the final session, we will focus on a "state of the art" defence of qualitative and comparative-historical research, both in theory and practice.

Wednesday 11 October

16:00
Foundations of Qualitative Methods: Introduction and Overview (1 of 2) Not bookable 16:00 - 17:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 4

Introducing students to the general philosophical debates concerning scientific methodology; assessing their ramifications for the conduct of qualitative social research. To critically evaluate major programmes in the philosophy of sciences, considering whether there are important analytic differences between the social and natural sciences; and whether qualitative methods themselves comprise a unified approach to the study of social reality.

Monday 16 October

12:30
Research Ethics (Michaelmas) Not bookable 12:30 - 15:30

Ethics is becoming an increasingly important issue for all researchers and the aim of this session is to demonstrate the practical value of thinking seriously and systematically about what constitutes ethical conduct in social science research. The session will involve some small-group work.

Tuesday 17 October

16:00
Comparative Historical Methods (2 of 4) Not bookable 16:00 - 17:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

These four sessions will introduce students to comparative historical research methods, emphasizing their qualitative dimensions. In the first session, we will analyze some contemporary classics within this genre. In the second and third sessions, we will review and distinguish among a variety of intellectual justifications for this genre as a methodology. In the final session, we will focus on a "state of the art" defence of qualitative and comparative-historical research, both in theory and practice.

Wednesday 18 October

16:00
Foundations of Qualitative Methods: Introduction and Overview (2 of 2) Not bookable 16:00 - 17:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 4

Introducing students to the general philosophical debates concerning scientific methodology; assessing their ramifications for the conduct of qualitative social research. To critically evaluate major programmes in the philosophy of sciences, considering whether there are important analytic differences between the social and natural sciences; and whether qualitative methods themselves comprise a unified approach to the study of social reality.

Monday 23 October

10:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-2) (1 of 4) Not bookable 10:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-1) (1 of 4) Not bookable 10:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

14:00
Survey Research and Design (1 of 4) Not bookable 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 4

The module aims to provide students with an introduction to and overview of survey methods and its uses and limitations. It will introduce students both to some of the main theoretical issues involved in survey research (such as survey sampling, non-response and question wording) and to practicalities of the design and analysis of surveys. Students who attend this course will be able to design their own evaluate research that uses surveys, in particular to understand issues concerning sample selection, response bias and data analysis; to appreciate and use basic principles of questionnaire design; and to trace appropriate sources of data and appropriate exemplars of good survey practice.

Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-1) (2 of 4) Not bookable 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

16:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-2) (2 of 4) Not bookable 16:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

Reading and Understanding Statistics (1 of 4) Not bookable 16:00 - 18:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This module is for students who don’t plan to use quantitative methods in their own research, but who need to be able to read and understand published research using quantitative methods. You will learn how to interpret graphs, frequency tables and multivariate regression results, and to ask intelligent questions about sampling, methods and statistical inference. The module is aimed at complete beginners, with no prior knowledge of statistics or quantitative methods.

Tuesday 24 October

16:00
Comparative Historical Methods (3 of 4) Not bookable 16:00 - 17:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

These four sessions will introduce students to comparative historical research methods, emphasizing their qualitative dimensions. In the first session, we will analyze some contemporary classics within this genre. In the second and third sessions, we will review and distinguish among a variety of intellectual justifications for this genre as a methodology. In the final session, we will focus on a "state of the art" defence of qualitative and comparative-historical research, both in theory and practice.

Wednesday 25 October

10:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-3) (1 of 4) Not bookable 10:00 - 12:00 Venue TBC

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-4) (1 of 4) Not bookable 10:00 - 12:00 Venue TBC

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

14:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-3) (2 of 4) Not bookable 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

16:00
Psychometrics (1 of 4) Not bookable 16:00 - 18:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

An introduction to the design, validation and implementation of tests and questionnaires in social science research, using both Classical Test Theory (CTT) and modern psychometric methods such as Item Response Theory (IRT). This course aims to enable students to: be able to construct and validate a test or questionnaire; understand the strengths, weaknesses and limitations of existing tests and questionnaires; appreciate the impact and potential of modern psychometric methods in the internet age.

This module is part of the Social Science Research Methods Centre training programme which is a shared platform for providing research students with a broad range of quantitative and qualitative research methods skills that are relevant across the social sciences.

Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-4) (2 of 4) Not bookable 16:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

Monday 30 October

10:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-2) (3 of 4) Not bookable 10:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-1) (3 of 4) Not bookable 10:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

14:00
Survey Research and Design (2 of 4) Not bookable 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 4

The module aims to provide students with an introduction to and overview of survey methods and its uses and limitations. It will introduce students both to some of the main theoretical issues involved in survey research (such as survey sampling, non-response and question wording) and to practicalities of the design and analysis of surveys. Students who attend this course will be able to design their own evaluate research that uses surveys, in particular to understand issues concerning sample selection, response bias and data analysis; to appreciate and use basic principles of questionnaire design; and to trace appropriate sources of data and appropriate exemplars of good survey practice.

Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-1) (4 of 4) Not bookable 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

16:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-2) (4 of 4) Not bookable 16:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. Each session consists of a lecture part, and a computer lab part with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have completed the SSRMC Skill Check before applying for a place.


Students will receive am email to confirm their place, but they can also check whether their application has been successful by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key, then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module should be made via:

Reading and Understanding Statistics (2 of 4) Not bookable 16:00 - 18:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This module is for students who don’t plan to use quantitative methods in their own research, but who need to be able to read and understand published research using quantitative methods. You will learn how to interpret graphs, frequency tables and multivariate regression results, and to ask intelligent questions about sampling, methods and statistical inference. The module is aimed at complete beginners, with no prior knowledge of statistics or quantitative methods.