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University Information Services course timetable

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Fri 28 Feb – Thu 12 Mar

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Monday 2 March

14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (1 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Tuesday 3 March

09:30
Access 2016: Further Use (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is intended for those already using Microsoft Access 2016 who wish to explore more advanced queries and forms. Those who have attended the Access 2016: Creating a Simple Database course will find this follows on seamlessly from where that course left off - but be prepared for a harder challenge. Part of the course explores relational database design concepts for simple databases. The remainder focuses on more advanced queries and forms. The second session is optional for you to either work through and consolidate the course material, or to receive support on your own project.

Excel 2016: Analysing and Summarising Data [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This hands-on course is a follow up from the Excel: Introduction course.

Collaboration Tools: Microsoft Teams - Getting Started with Chat, Meetings, Files and Apps (F2A) - Pilot new (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Join us in this getting started session where you will learn how to get up and running with Microsoft Teams to collobaorate with other team members.

  • Chat in a group or one-to-one
  • Meet instantly go from group chat to video conference with the touch of a button
  • Collaborate never do that frantic, searching-for-files thing ever again. In Teams you can access, share, and edit Word docs, PowerPoint, and Excel files in real time
  • Use Channel Tabs and Apps to collaborate
  • Be seen and heard Anywhere on Any device
10:00
Accessibility: How to Produce Accessible Documents - An Introduction (Workshop) new POSTPONED 10:00 - 12:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course will show you basic principles and processes for creating accessible documents in Microsoft Word and PowerPoint and PDFs.

13:30
Collaboration Tools: Microsoft Teams - Getting Started with Chat, Meetings, Files and Apps (F2A) - Pilot new (2 of 2) [Places] 13:30 - 16:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Join us in this getting started session where you will learn how to get up and running with Microsoft Teams to collobaorate with other team members.

  • Chat in a group or one-to-one
  • Meet instantly go from group chat to video conference with the touch of a button
  • Collaborate never do that frantic, searching-for-files thing ever again. In Teams you can access, share, and edit Word docs, PowerPoint, and Excel files in real time
  • Use Channel Tabs and Apps to collaborate
  • Be seen and heard Anywhere on Any device
14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (2 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Wednesday 4 March

09:30
Access 2016: Further Use (2 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is intended for those already using Microsoft Access 2016 who wish to explore more advanced queries and forms. Those who have attended the Access 2016: Creating a Simple Database course will find this follows on seamlessly from where that course left off - but be prepared for a harder challenge. Part of the course explores relational database design concepts for simple databases. The remainder focuses on more advanced queries and forms. The second session is optional for you to either work through and consolidate the course material, or to receive support on your own project.

Photogrammetry and Related 3D Imaging Technologies - An Introduction: CreatingThree-dimensional Models from a Set of Images new (1 of 2) POSTPONED 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course provides an introduction to Photogrammetry, or the creation of three-dimensional (3D) models from two-dimensional (2D) data obtained from photographs, while introducing related 3D concepts and technologies. Along with basic 3D concepts (point clouds, meshes, file formats) there will be an overview and experience of creating and managing 3D images, which will provide a better understanding of the process of capturing 3D data from a variety of objects (from a stone to a city). Specialist software (e.g. Agisoft Metashape) will be introduced in order to build a 3D model from a series of photos, using a trial version of the product to produce and adjust your 3D model.

Exploring some of the competing methods of capturing 3D data in several fields, including 3D scanning and CT scanning, will be combined with an overview of preparing the results for use in research, in publications, and in VR/AR/XR projects. In addition, some useful sources of information and guidance will be provided, along with software and hardware tips and some of the key repositories used for sharing your models, or for making use of models made by others, or just for getting inspired. This course also will provide an opportunity to meet others who are already using or would like to use photogrammetry or other 3D technologies in their research or personal projects.

14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (3 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Thursday 5 March

09:30
Excel 2016: Functions [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course covers some of the more challenging functions such as IF, SUMIFS and VLOOKUP. Not all chapters will be taught in full due to time constraints but are included for self-study.

Photogrammetry and Related 3D Imaging Technologies - An Introduction: CreatingThree-dimensional Models from a Set of Images new (2 of 2) POSTPONED 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course provides an introduction to Photogrammetry, or the creation of three-dimensional (3D) models from two-dimensional (2D) data obtained from photographs, while introducing related 3D concepts and technologies. Along with basic 3D concepts (point clouds, meshes, file formats) there will be an overview and experience of creating and managing 3D images, which will provide a better understanding of the process of capturing 3D data from a variety of objects (from a stone to a city). Specialist software (e.g. Agisoft Metashape) will be introduced in order to build a 3D model from a series of photos, using a trial version of the product to produce and adjust your 3D model.

Exploring some of the competing methods of capturing 3D data in several fields, including 3D scanning and CT scanning, will be combined with an overview of preparing the results for use in research, in publications, and in VR/AR/XR projects. In addition, some useful sources of information and guidance will be provided, along with software and hardware tips and some of the key repositories used for sharing your models, or for making use of models made by others, or just for getting inspired. This course also will provide an opportunity to meet others who are already using or would like to use photogrammetry or other 3D technologies in their research or personal projects.

10:30
Drupal: An Introduction [Places] 10:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course will cover the most essential features and concepts of Drupal Content Management Service through hands on activities.

Friday 6 March

09:30
Collaboration Tools: Microsoft Teams - Getting Started with Chat, Meetings, Files and Apps (Research Development Teams) - Pilot new (1 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Join us in this getting started session where you will learn how to get up and running with Microsoft Teams to collobaorate with other team members.

  • Chat in a group or one-to-one
  • Meet instantly go from group chat to video conference with the touch of a button
  • Collaborate never do that frantic, searching-for-files thing ever again. In Teams you can access, share, and edit Word docs, PowerPoint, and Excel files in real time
  • Use Channel Tabs and Apps to collaborate
  • Be seen and heard Anywhere on Any device
13:30
Collaboration Tools: Microsoft Teams - Getting Started with Chat, Meetings, Files and Apps (Research Development Teams) - Pilot new (2 of 2) [Full] 13:30 - 16:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Join us in this getting started session where you will learn how to get up and running with Microsoft Teams to collobaorate with other team members.

  • Chat in a group or one-to-one
  • Meet instantly go from group chat to video conference with the touch of a button
  • Collaborate never do that frantic, searching-for-files thing ever again. In Teams you can access, share, and edit Word docs, PowerPoint, and Excel files in real time
  • Use Channel Tabs and Apps to collaborate
  • Be seen and heard Anywhere on Any device

Tuesday 10 March

09:30
PHP: From Basics to Data Collection Through a Webform (1 of 2) POSTPONED 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This PHP introduction course explores the basic elements of PHP script programming. PHP allows web developers to write dynamic web pages, for instance by simplifying ways to collect data through a web form, and to process and include data, by placing small scripts directly into HTML files.

Session 1 will provide background, tools and exercises for writing and editing PHP in HTML files, uploading them to a web server, and making them available online. There will also be an introduction to programming in PHP, to help enable you to later adapt the examples to address your more advanced examples and projects.

Session 2 will extend the simpler exercises in Session 1, adding more options and capabilities, as well as providing new and more advanced examples. Using the tools and techniques from Session 1, there will be opportunities to adjust and partly customise the examples, and if time permits potentially begin a small exercise of your own.

Excel 2016: Recorded Macros [Places] 09:30 - 11:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course covers recording macros which provides automated steps to produce outcomes. This course does not teach VBA programming in full though you will gain an insight into what VBA is and how it relates to macros. if you want to learn VBA as a programming language then please see the self-taught course Programming in VBA - Using Microsoft Excel 2013. Not all chapters will be taught in full due to time constraints but are included for self-study.

14:00
Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (1 of 3) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.

Wednesday 11 March

09:30
PHP: From Basics to Data Collection Through a Webform (2 of 2) POSTPONED 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This PHP introduction course explores the basic elements of PHP script programming. PHP allows web developers to write dynamic web pages, for instance by simplifying ways to collect data through a web form, and to process and include data, by placing small scripts directly into HTML files.

Session 1 will provide background, tools and exercises for writing and editing PHP in HTML files, uploading them to a web server, and making them available online. There will also be an introduction to programming in PHP, to help enable you to later adapt the examples to address your more advanced examples and projects.

Session 2 will extend the simpler exercises in Session 1, adding more options and capabilities, as well as providing new and more advanced examples. Using the tools and techniques from Session 1, there will be opportunities to adjust and partly customise the examples, and if time permits potentially begin a small exercise of your own.

Python 3: Advanced Topics (Self-paced) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series and is suitable for people who have Python experience equivalent to either of the introductory courses: Introduction for Absolute Beginners or Introduction for Programmers

These sessions consist of a selection of self-paced mini-courses, each taking at most a half-day. Python expert(s) from the UCS will be present to answer questions or address difficulties with these. Attendees can select from the available topics to most closely meet their individual needs. Attendees are welcome to attend more than one session to work through multiple topics. If an attendee finishes a topic with time to spare they may select another, and so on.

Web Authoring: HTML - Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) for Beginners (Level 2) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This is a practical-based course for anyone with a basic understanding of HTML. The course will introduce Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and show how they can (and should) be used effectively when creating web pages. The course teaches how to write CSS from scratch using a basic Text Editor. By the end of the course participants will have adapted a small website consisting of four pages so that it is styled using a single Cascading Style Sheet. Course participants will have the opportunity to publish these using DS-Web.

14:00
Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (2 of 3) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.

Thursday 12 March

10:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (1 of 2) [Places] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

14:00
Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (3 of 3) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.

LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (2 of 2) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.