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University Information Services course timetable

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Fri 22 Feb – Mon 11 Mar

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Monday 25 February

14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (1 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Tuesday 26 February

09:30
Access 2016: Further Use (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is intended for those already using Microsoft Access 2016 who wish to explore more advanced queries and forms. Those who have attended the Access 2016: Creating a Simple Database course will find this follows on seamlessly from where that course left off - but be prepared for a harder challenge. Part of the course explores relational database design concepts for simple databases. The remainder focuses on more advanced queries and forms. The second session is optional for you to either work through and consolidate the course material, or to receive support on your own project.

14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (2 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Wednesday 27 February

09:30
Access 2016: Further Use (2 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is intended for those already using Microsoft Access 2016 who wish to explore more advanced queries and forms. Those who have attended the Access 2016: Creating a Simple Database course will find this follows on seamlessly from where that course left off - but be prepared for a harder challenge. Part of the course explores relational database design concepts for simple databases. The remainder focuses on more advanced queries and forms. The second session is optional for you to either work through and consolidate the course material, or to receive support on your own project.

14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (3 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

14:15

Handling the large volume of spam, ransomware and other malware delivered via email to often indignant users has become quite a large part of standard IT duties over the past few years. Along with the increasing complexity of the tricks and techniques used by hacker groups for spearphishing and delivering malware, it is clearly apparent that there is only so much that professional IT staff can expect from their users in terms of determining what is, and is not, malware or phishing.

Yet the pressure on often relatively junior administrative and financial staff has not decreased and the time taken to try and work out what is genuine and what is not does not make for smooth time management. Most important of all, IT practitioners must not indulge in the blame culture when an incident happens, simply because the person blamed will probably never "own up" to making a possible mistake again. A positive culture - even admitting "Yes, it has happened to me" - is essential to encourage users to be open about mistakes.

This seminar will attempt to show some of the more common of the latest spammer tricks, and introduce some tools which (hopefully) will make your life easier.

Thursday 28 February

09:30
Excel 2016: Functions [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course covers some of the more challenging functions such as IF, SUMIFS and VLOOKUP. Not all chapters will be taught in full due to time constraints but are included for self-study.

10:30
Falcon on Drupal: Migration from Falcon On Plone - An Introduction [Places] 10:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course has been designed for web editors of institutions that are migrating from the Falcon on Plone content management system to the new Falcon on Drupal Content Management Service.

14:00
Adobe Photoshop CC: Advanced (Level 2) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Following on from the Photoshop CC: Introduction (Level 1) course, this course covers some of the more advanced features of Adobe Photoshop CC, which is the latest version of the popular image manipulation and editing tool for graphics and design professionals and photographers. The course will explore some of the more advanced features of Photoshop. Techniques will be explained and demonstrated, and participants will then be given the opportunity to practice these for themselves.

Monday 4 March

14:00
Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (1 of 3) [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.

Tuesday 5 March

09:30
Excel 2016: Recorded Macros [Places] 09:30 - 11:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course covers recording macros which provides automated steps to produce outcomes. This course does not teach VBA programming, if you want to learn VBA then please see the self-taught course Programming in VBA - Using Microsoft Excel 2013. Not all chapters will be taught in full due to time constraints but are included for self-study.

PHP: From Basics to Data Collection through a Webform (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This PHP introduction course explores the basic elements of PHP script programming. PHP allows web developers to write dynamic web pages, for instance by simplifying ways to collect data through a web form, and to process and include data, by placing small scripts directly into HTML files.

Session 1 will provide background, tools and exercises for writing and editing PHP in HTML files, uploading them to a web server, and making them available online. There will also be an introduction to programming in PHP, to help enable you to later adapt the examples to address your more advanced examples and projects.

Session 2 will extend the simpler exercises in Session 1, adding more options and capabilities, as well as providing new and more advanced examples. Using the tools and techniques from Session 1, there will be opportunities to adjust and partly customise the examples, and if time permits potentially begin a small exercise of your own.

10:00
Save Time and Increase Your Productivity with Dragon NaturallySpeaking [Places] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Countless busy professionals are now turning to speech recognition to speed up creating documents and streamlining their workflow.

This course will focus on how to use Dragon NaturallySpeaking for education to improve accuracy and will show you how to customise the software for your writing style.

The aim of this course is to teach you how to achieve 99% accuracy with Dragon NaturallySpeaking so that you spend less time correcting mis-recognitions and more time dictating text at speeds of up to 140 words per minute!

With Dragon you are only limited to the speed you can think - come and learn how get Dragon working for you!

See success stories of how Dragon is being used by education.

Wednesday 6 March

09:30
Python 3: Advanced Topics (Self-paced) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series and is suitable for people who have Python experience equivalent to either of the introductory courses: Introduction for Absolute Beginners or Introduction for Programmers

These sessions consist of a selection of self-paced mini-courses, each taking at most a half-day. Python expert(s) from the UCS will be present to answer questions or address difficulties with these. Attendees can select from the available topics to most closely meet their individual needs. Attendees are welcome to attend more than one session to work through multiple topics. If an attendee finishes a topic with time to spare they may select another, and so on.

Web Authoring: HTML - Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) for Beginners (Level 2) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This is a practical-based course for anyone with a basic understanding of HTML. The course will introduce Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and show how they can (and should) be used effectively when creating web pages. The course teaches how to write CSS from scratch using a basic Text Editor. By the end of the course participants will have adapted a small website consisting of four pages so that it is styled using a single Cascading Style Sheet. Course participants will have the opportunity to publish these using DS-Web.

PHP: From Basics to Data Collection through a Webform (2 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This PHP introduction course explores the basic elements of PHP script programming. PHP allows web developers to write dynamic web pages, for instance by simplifying ways to collect data through a web form, and to process and include data, by placing small scripts directly into HTML files.

Session 1 will provide background, tools and exercises for writing and editing PHP in HTML files, uploading them to a web server, and making them available online. There will also be an introduction to programming in PHP, to help enable you to later adapt the examples to address your more advanced examples and projects.

Session 2 will extend the simpler exercises in Session 1, adding more options and capabilities, as well as providing new and more advanced examples. Using the tools and techniques from Session 1, there will be opportunities to adjust and partly customise the examples, and if time permits potentially begin a small exercise of your own.

14:00
Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (2 of 3) [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.

Thursday 7 March

09:30
Publisher 2016: Creating Professional Publications [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Do you want to create more professional publications by having a deeper appreciation of what Publisher can do for you? Through a series of graded exercises this course focuses on practical work giving you ample opportunity to use your PC skills to produce various publications. Please note that this course is largely about learning the software rather than design.

Introduction to Lean in HE (Equivalent to Yellow Belt Level) new [Full] 09:30 - 16:30 Greenwich House, Edmonton Room

The course is designed to give participants an overview of Lean six sigma thinking as applied within Higher Education, and an explanation of some of the basic tools used to improve business processes.

10:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (1 of 2) [Places] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

11:30
Mentoring: what it means to you (briefing session) new [Places] 11:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Huntingdon Room

Our mentoring scheme needs you! We facilitate this supportive initiative exclusively for the IT community and UIS staff. Since the launch in 2017, we have adapted the scheme to improve its effectiveness as the number of participants has grown. We'll provide guidance workshops and reference materials to help support you, so you can gain the most out of being a mentor or mentee.

This briefing session will give you an idea on what you can expect to get out of the scheme, you'll hear from others already involved and understand what it means to be a mentor or mentee.

14:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (2 of 2) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

Friday 8 March

10:30
Drupal: An Introduction [Places] 10:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course will cover the most essential features and concepts of Drupal Content Management Service through hands on activities.

14:00
Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (3 of 3) [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.

Monday 11 March

09:00
UTBS: New Provider Training Manager Training [Places] 09:00 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is designed for the Training Manager(s) of a new provider on the University Training Booking System. (UTBS) and it will take them through theory and practicals on how to manage their training programme on the UTBS