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This session provides an overview of the extensive e-resources available to Divinity Undergraduates, including e-books, e-journals, databases and the use of Moodle.

This session provides an overview of the extensive e-resources relevant to Theology, Religious Studies and the Philosophy of Religion, including e-books, e-journals, databases and electronic legal deposit materials (journal articles and monographs).

This session provides an introduction to the use of IDiscover (the University Library catalogue), for new Postgraduate students and Academic staff, demonstrating the main functions of the catalogue and showing how to make the most effective use of its capabilities for locating books and journals in print and electronic form.

This session provides an introduction to the use of IDiscover (the University Library catalogue), for new Postgraduate students and Academic staff, demonstrating the main functions of the catalogue and showing how to make the most effective use of its capabilities for locating books and journals in print and electronic form.

An Introduction to Open Research for STEM PhD students new Mon 24 Oct 2016   10:00 Finished
  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for postgraduate students at all stages of their research.

An Introduction to the Manuscripts Reading Room Tue 24 Oct 2017   11:00 Finished

An introduction to the Manuscripts Reading Room and the collections of the Manuscripts and University Archives department. The session includes information on using the room, searching collections and services offered by the department.

This sessions aims to demystify the UL and its colllections for students of Economics and Development Studies. A brief presentation will tell you all you need to know about finding and borrowing books and will be followed by a tour of the bookstacks.

Bibliographic Searching for TRS Researchers Mon 29 Oct 2018   12:30 [Places]

Introduction to Bibliographic Searching in Theology and Religious Studies will give a brief overview of the issues of searching for publications in general, and follow this up with searching the specialist Theology and Religious studies bibliographic database ATLA and Index Theologicus.

The UL is unique: a national, legal deposit library with an amazing collection of around 8 million items in total, and over 1 million maps. This special session consists of a tour to help participants get to know the building, followed by an introduction to the Map Room and its holdings.

An introduction to the various online catalogue interfaces used by the University, presented by members of staff at the main University Library.

The session will cover different ways of finding print and electronic resources held by the University of Cambridge. We will introduce some of the systems you will need to use, and try to explain some of the functions (and quirks!) of these systems.

There will be a presentation covering the various catalogues and web pages, followed by some hands on exercises to give you some useful practical experience.

Chinese Resources Tue 20 Oct 2015   10:00 Finished

The Chinese collections of Cambridge University Library are among the finest outside China, including inscribed oracle bones dating from the 13th century BC; over 200,000 printed monograph titles, the earliest of which dates from the 12th century AD, and about 3,000 serial titles; about 200,000 digital books; as well as manuscripts, paintings, rubbings and other artefacts. This session will provide a brief introduction to these collections and guidance on how to make the best use of them.

Critical Appraisal For Doctors new Mon 4 Apr 2016   14:00 Finished

Critical appraisal is the process of carefully and systematically examining research to judge its trustworthiness, and its value and relevance in a particular context.' Amanda Burls, What is Critical Appraisal?, Feb 2009

'An Introduction to Critical Appraisal' will help you understand how to critically appraise a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT). Using the CASP Checklist the course covers samples and sample size, randomisation, bias, statistics, significance (P Values and Confidence Intervals) and relevance.

We ask that you read a paper that will be provided before you attend the session, in order for us to make the best use of the time together.

We start with an orientation session at the Divinity Faculty (ca. 45 minutes), followed by a tour of the University Library (ca. 30 minutes) for Divinity Faculty members, led by members of the Divinity Faculty Library staff.

You own your own research right? Well it depends. In this session we will explore the sometimes very complicated world of copyright and what can happen when you publish your work. We'll also introduce you to concepts such as third party copyright, and how you can use existing licencing tools to maximise the reach of your research as well as using other peoples work to advance your own, but legally.

The Graduate Self-Assessment tool is intended for those in the Humanities & Social Sciences and Arts & Humanities schools. It is the first step in an online module designed to help you to assess your own skill-set, identify target areas for improvement and make decisions about what to do next. The tool is recommended for all first year postgraduates, but will be available for you to return to check on your progress.

Once you have completed the self-assessment exercise a number of options for developing your skills will become available to you, ranging from reading articles to signing up for relevant face-to-face workshops.

We encourage students to take the survey about once a year, but it is particularly useful for those who are just starting their PhD and for those who are just entering the final year of their PhD.

You will need to click here to gain access to the self-assessment tool.

If you already know the basics of Research Data Management (RDM) – for example backing up your work, file storage options - but now need to know more about effective strategies for sharing your data, then this course is for you!

This course gives a brief recap on RDM and then covers managing personal and sensitive data in the context of the new GDPR legislation, why it is a Good Thing to share your data, and how to do this most effectively in terms of describing your data, deciding where to share it, and using licences to control how your data is used by others. You will even get to write your own Data Management Plan (DMP): these help you manage your data throughout a project and after it has ended and are increasingly required as part of a grant or fellowship application. You will also learn about the range of support services available to you within the University for managing your data.

If you are completely new to the concept of research data management then the beginners course is for you.

What would happen to your research data if your lab exploded, or your laptop was stolen, or your cloud storage account was hacked? How could you prevent data loss in these situations? Managing your data effectively is vital to help you do this.

This workshop will introduce the basic principles of Research Data Management (RDM) and how they are relevant throughout the research life cycle.

Intended for those who are new to RDM, this course will firstly explain what RDM is, and then go on to cover basic data back-up and storage options, file sharing tools, and strategies for organising your data, as well as providing guidance on managing personal or sensitive data. You will also learn about the range of support services available to you within the University for managing your data.

If you already have a basic understanding of RDM then the advanced course is probably more appropriate for you to attend.

Electronic resources in Theology and Religious Studies will give a brief overview of the various e-resources, which are particularly relevant for undergraduate students.

E-resources in Theology and Religious Studies will give a brief overview of the most relevant online resources for undergraduates.

English Faculty: UL Tour Fri 21 Oct 2016   12:00 Finished

An Orientation tour of the University Library for English Faculty students, led by members of the English Faculty Library staff.

To book your place, please go to the English Faculty Library's booking system and click on the tour you wish to attend.

E-Resources drop-in new Mon 6 Nov 2017   12:45 Finished

A drop-in session where members of the e-journals and e-books teams will be on hand to help with any questions you may have about these resources.

This session covers the essential pieces of information needed to perform searches for eresources, ejournals and ebooks on the different interfaces available to you in Cambridge. It includes recommended approaches to searching articles in journals and appropriate citation databases in different subject areas. You will be guided to preferred routes to access resources off campus and given help on the various platforms for accessing ebooks.

Finding Secondary Literature Mon 19 Nov 2018   12:00 [Places]

Finding secondary literature to inform and support your research is paramount to any higher-level research. This session focuses on the concepts as well as practical issues, to give participants a more comprehensive understanding of the issues and features of literature searching.

Find what you need fast - Life Sciences resources new Mon 30 Oct 2017   15:00 Finished

This session will show what electronic resources are available to researchers in the Life Sciences. You will be shown how to effectively search specialist databases so you can get exactly what you want, when you want from University of Cambridge resources.

This session will show what electronic resources are available to researchers in the Physical Sciences and Technology areas. You will be shown how to effectively search specialist databases so you can get exactly what you want, when you want from University of Cambridge resources.

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