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Cambridge University Libraries course timetable

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Wed 15 May – Thu 13 Jun

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[ No events on Wed 15 May ]

May 2024

Thu 16
Managing your Research with Endnote [Places] 11:00 - 12:00 Cambridge University Libraries Online

Using a reference manager is one of the best ways to look after crucial research literature, whether planning for a literature review or simply keeping track of developments in a particular discipline. This session will introduce Endnote.

Using live demonstrations, discussions, and troubleshooting common referencing issues, the session will give an in-depth look at how Endnote (and tools like it) can help maximise a research project workflow while also ensuring that critical resources and information are not lost at any point in the research process.

Mon 20
Biological Sciences: Understanding copyright and your research [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Cambridge University Libraries Online

You own your own research right? Well it depends...

This session will explore the sometimes complicated world of copyright and what can happen when publishing work through formal routes such as journals or through more informal routes such as pre-print servers. The session will also introduce concepts such as third party copyright and rights retention, as well as how licensing tools such as Creative Commons can be used to not only help maximise the reach of research but also navigating reusing other people's work.

Wed 22
Managing your Research Data for Researchers (Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences) [Places] 11:00 - 12:30 Cambridge University Libraries Online

Managing your data well is a key responsibility as a researcher and it prevents disasters. You will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to look after it properly.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Thu 23
Publishing in Journals for Researchers (Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences) [Places] 11:00 - 12:00 Cambridge University Libraries Online

Publishing journal articles is a key element of a successful research career.

Those starting on this journey may have a lot of questions, such as:

  • Where and how should I publish my research?
  • How do I maximise the number of readers and citations?
  • How should I respond to reviewers?
Mon 27
Biological Sciences: How to give great presentations [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Cambridge University Libraries Online

This session will introduce participants to different methods of communicating research before moving on to a discussion around best practice and techniques when preparing a presentation. Participants will be introduced to concepts around good design, accessibility, data presentation, and accessing Creative Commons licensed materials for their work.

The session will conclude with an exploration of good delivery techniques with additional advice on what to do if it all goes wrong.

Tue 28
Copyright and Creative Commons for Researchers [Places] 14:00 - 15:00 Cambridge University Libraries Online

From fair dealing to sharing your research online it seems that nothing with copyright is ever simple. There are few black and white rules about copyright but there can be serious consequences for getting things wrong! This session will cover the basics of UK copyright law and how these impact researchers such as dealing with third party materials, seeking permissions and how to manage risk.

Please note: This session will be offered, either online or in person, in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter terms.

Wed 29

Managing your data well is a key responsibility as a researcher and it prevents disasters. You will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to look after it properly.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Thu 30
Writing for Publication for Researchers (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths and Medicine) [Places] 11:00 - 12:00 Cambridge University Libraries Online

A session designed to take you step-by-step through academic writing and publication, with tips and resources to make writing up as simple as possible. The session will demystify the peer-review process, and help you to improve the precision and clarity of your academic writing.

June 2024

Mon 3
Biological Sciences: Getting started with Research Data Management [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Cambridge University Libraries Online

This session introduces participants to the concept of research data, all the forms that it can take as well as negotiating the management of different data depending on their type.

Topics such as effective storage, handling sensitive data, and developing best practice approaches to avoid data loss during a project will be covered. The session will also explore how to create a data management plan (DMP) and the support available, as well as providing an overview of useful tools and services both within the University of Cambridge and beyond.

Tue 4
Fair attribution and publishing for technicians new [Places] 11:00 - 12:30 West Hub, South Room

Fair attribution for technicians through either co-authorship or direct acknowledgement in research publications is a key component of the ‘visibility’ and ‘recognition’ areas of the Technician Commitment, of which the University of Cambridge was a founding signatory in 2017.

However, there is currently no policy or standard practice for acknowledging the role of technicians, equipment and facilities in the University or the wider sector. Technicians experience a great disparity in their recognition and visibility in scholarly outputs.

This interactive workshop, organised by the Biological Sciences Libraries Team, will introduce you to the scholarly communications process as well as tools such as CRediT and ORCID, and facilitate conversation amongst peers.

Wed 5
Peer Review new [Places] 15:00 - 16:00 West Hub, South Room

If you have recently started receiving peer reviews, or would like to become a reviewer, this is a chance to pick up tips and best practices for responding to reviews, getting your review done in time, being noticed as a reviewer, and getting credit for your work. In this session, you'll learn:

  • how to get noticed and increase the chance of being asked to review
  • how to communicate effectively with editors and authors
  • how to write constructive feedback that you wish you'd receive
  • how to be recognised for your peer review efforts
Thu 6
Academic Reading and Note Making for researchers (Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences) [Places] 11:00 - 12:00 Cambridge University Libraries Online

Effective note making is an essential bridge between reading and writing. When making notes for a long piece of writing, if you paraphrase and interpret as you go along, you will be able to retrieve what you have learned from reading quickly and efficiently and often produce sections that you can drop straight into your work. This session will introduce you to the theory of good note making, discuss different note making techniques and offer advice for deciding which approach best suits your practices.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this session, you should be able to:

  • Explain the importance of strategic reading
  • Identify strategic reading approaches that fit your needs
  • Explain the difference between note taking and note making
  • Explain the link between reading, note making and academic writing

Please note: This session will be offered again in Easter term, date to be confirmed.

Thu 13
Biological Sciences: Looking after your online presence - social media [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Cambridge University Libraries Online

This session discusses the benefits and challenges of maintaining an online presence as a researcher. Part of two sessions on this topic, this second session looks at using social media as a researcher. We will look at the practicalities and pros and cons of online engagement through tools such as Twitter/X, Mastodon, YouTube and LinkedIn.

Participants should expect to have the opportunity to critically evaluate the various options presented in this session with the overall aim of being better informed when deciding where to invest their time and efforts when building an academic presence online.