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Cambridge University Library Training

Cambridge University Library course timetable

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Sun 18 Feb – Thu 15 Mar

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Monday 19 February

10:00
Publishing your research effectively [Places] 10:00 - 11:30 17 Mill Lane, Seminar Room B

This session will cover the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively through publication. It will introduce how you should decide which academic journal is most appropriate for your research, including considerations such as journal rankings, publication times, fees and your own publication history. It will also cover the concept of using pre-print servers before publication - when and where to post your work and the benefits it can bring.

Please bring your own internet-enabled device to this session.

12:00
Medicine: Writing for Publication new [Places] 12:00 - 13:00 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

A course designed to take you step-by-step through academic writing and publication, with tips and resources to make writing up as simple as possible. The course will demystify the peer-review process, and help you to improve the precision and clarity of your academic writing.

Tuesday 20 February

13:00
It's dangerous to go alone, take this - using Twitter for research [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Glass Room

Want to learn how to use Twitter? Need to know the difference between a hashtag and a gif and how they can help inspire and push your research forward? In this interactive session we will take you through the basics of how Twitter works and how you can get Twitter to work for you and your research.

While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members.

This session is part of our gaming-themed Moore Methods lunchtime series of talks.

Wednesday 21 February

09:30
Managing your research data effectively and working reproducibly for beginners [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Glass Room

This workshop will work through the challenges around managing research data as well as the benefits of working reproducibly. Participants will be provided with in depth guidance and resources on how to effectively manage projects and avoid data loss throughout the research process.

You will hear of what can happen if researchers do not manage their data well as well as what happens to research data after the end of a project, such as how to share and store data in a long-term and sustainable way. It is never too early to start thinking about these things, so get a head start on your research data management practices now!

If you already have some understanding about how to manage your research data well but would like a refresher and more information about the University’s support around data management then consider going to our recap course.

14:30
Orientation Tour [Places] 14:30 - 15:15 University Library

The UL is unique: a national, legal deposit library with an amazing collection of around 8 million items - over two million of which you can browse on our open shelves. If that sounds a bit daunting, why not come on a brief orientation tour to help you find your way around? We’ll even tell you what we keep in the famous Library tower ...

Please note this tour does not cover the University's vast electronic and digital collections: to find out more about using these, please see check for courses on our timetable or ask a member of Library staff for help.

Thursday 22 February

10:00
Medicine: Critical Appraisal - RCT Drug Trials new [Places] 10:00 - 11:30 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

Critical appraisal is the process of carefully and systematically examining research to judge its trustworthiness, and its value and relevance in a particular context.' Amanda Burls, What is Critical Appraisal?, Feb 2009

'An Introduction to Critical Appraisal' will help you understand how to critically appraise a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT). Using the CASP Checklist the course covers samples and sample size, randomisation, bias, statistics, significance (P Values and Confidence Intervals) and relevance.

We ask that you read a paper that will be provided before you attend the session, in order for us to make the best use of the time together.

14:00
Medicine: Literature Searching for Allied Health Professionals new [Places] 14:00 - 16:00 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

One session covering the Cinahl database, targeted at allied health professionals. Learn how to get the best out of your literature searches.

Tuesday 27 February

10:00
Medicine: Critical Appraisal - Physiotherapy Interventions new [Places] 10:00 - 11:30 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

Critical appraisal is the process of carefully and systematically examining research to judge its trustworthiness, and its value and relevance in a particular context.' Amanda Burls, What is Critical Appraisal?, Feb 2009

'An Introduction to Critical Appraisal' will help you understand how to critically appraise a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT). Using the CASP Checklist the course covers samples and sample size, randomisation, bias, statistics, significance (P Values and Confidence Intervals) and relevance.

We ask that you read a paper that will be provided before you attend the session, in order for us to make the best use of the time together.

14:30
Orientation Tour [Places] 14:30 - 15:15 University Library

The UL is unique: a national, legal deposit library with an amazing collection of around 8 million items - over two million of which you can browse on our open shelves. If that sounds a bit daunting, why not come on a brief orientation tour to help you find your way around? We’ll even tell you what we keep in the famous Library tower ...

Please note this tour does not cover the University's vast electronic and digital collections: to find out more about using these, please see check for courses on our timetable or ask a member of Library staff for help.

Wednesday 28 February

14:30
Orientation Tour [Places] 14:30 - 15:15 University Library

The UL is unique: a national, legal deposit library with an amazing collection of around 8 million items - over two million of which you can browse on our open shelves. If that sounds a bit daunting, why not come on a brief orientation tour to help you find your way around? We’ll even tell you what we keep in the famous Library tower ...

Please note this tour does not cover the University's vast electronic and digital collections: to find out more about using these, please see check for courses on our timetable or ask a member of Library staff for help.

Thursday 1 March

14:00
Showcasing Tools and Resources for Graduates [Places] 14:00 - 15:30 University Centre, Cormack Room

The session involves multiple 'showcases' of a variety of topics, including the following:

  • reference management software (Zotero and Mendeley)
  • presenting your work (blogging, Canva)
  • managing academic work (Evernote, Symplectic Elements)
  • organisation and time management (Trello, Bulletjournal)

Attendees will be able to rotate between these different areas, sampling presentations and exploring tools on the areas that interest them most, or what they feel they need to learn more about. The session will be led by librarians from across the different Schools in the university, and from the University Library.

You may find it useful to bring a laptop with you to join in with some of the presentations.

Friday 2 March

13:00
Player 2 has entered the game - ways of working towards open science [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Glass Room

This session will introduce participants to the ideas of working openly and reproducibly through presenting case studies and tools to help facilitate this kind of work. From GitHub to good file naming conventions, participants will be given the opportunity to learn from other people’s failures and to be better at future-proofing their research.

While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members.

This session is part of our gaming-themed Moore Methods lunchtime series of talks.

Monday 5 March

10:00
How to manage your research data well: Recap [Places] 10:00 - 11:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 10

Do you have an automated back up set? Got your file naming convention nailed? Thought you knew your funder’s requirements for sharing your data but have now got doubts? This whistle-stop tour of good data management practices covers all the things you should already know about managing your data well in a succinct way and points to further University support for data management. If you already know the basics of data management – backing up your work, how to share files, why and how you should be working reproducibly – but you need a refresher, then this course is for you!

If you are completely new to the concept of research data management then the beginners course is for you.

Tuesday 6 March

13:00
Beating your final boss battle, or presenting with confidence and style (easy mode) [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Glass Room

This session will show good presentation design, give tips on good science communication, as well as getting people to think about different tools and ways of presenting their ideas. This is our lite session but if you want to have a more HD experience, check out our longer hands-on workshop.

While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members.

This session is part of our gaming-themed Moore Methods lunchtime series of talks.

14:00
Zotero for Graduates [Places] 14:00 - 15:00 Faculty of English, GR04

The aim of the workshop is to give an overview of how graduate students can make effective use of Zotero software for referencing and managing information. It will especially suit graduate students from the School of Arts and Humanities, and Humanities and Social Sciences. There will be plenty of time at the end for questions about the use of Zotero in your field of research.

It would be extremely valuable for you to download and familiarize yourself with Zotero in advance of the session. Zotero is free, and works with Chrome, Firefox and Safari.

To do this, please go to Zotero. Download Zotero itself and install the browser connector. You may also find it useful to create an account with Zotero; the benefits of doing so will be outlined during the session.

If you have any difficulty with downloading Zotero in advance, please feel free to contact the course organiser, Helen Murphy, at hem37@cam.ac.uk.

Wednesday 7 March

10:00
Medicine: The "Big Four" Databases For Your Literature Search [Places] 10:00 - 12:00 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

One session - four medicine and life science databases - widest coverage for your literature search. PubMed is great, but it doesn't cover all the journals relevant to life sciences and medicine. Embase, Web of Science and Scopus can also be relevant and each covers unique material. Come to this hands-on session to learn how to get the best from each of these "4 tops".

14:30
Orientation Tour [Places] 14:30 - 15:15 University Library

The UL is unique: a national, legal deposit library with an amazing collection of around 8 million items - over two million of which you can browse on our open shelves. If that sounds a bit daunting, why not come on a brief orientation tour to help you find your way around? We’ll even tell you what we keep in the famous Library tower ...

Please note this tour does not cover the University's vast electronic and digital collections: to find out more about using these, please see check for courses on our timetable or ask a member of Library staff for help.

Thursday 8 March

10:00
Medicine: Critical Appraisal - Systematic Reviews new [Places] 10:00 - 11:30 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

Critical appraisal is the process of carefully and systematically examining research to judge its trustworthiness, and its value and relevance in a particular context.' Amanda Burls, What is Critical Appraisal?, Feb 2009

This course will help you understand how to critically appraise a systematic review.

We ask that you read a paper that will be provided before you attend the session, in order for us to make the best use of the time together.

Friday 9 March

10:00
Zotero for Graduates [Places] 10:00 - 11:00 Faculty of English, GR04

The aim of the workshop is to give an overview of how graduate students can make effective use of Zotero software for referencing and managing information. It will especially suit graduate students from the School of Arts and Humanities, and Humanities and Social Sciences. There will be plenty of time at the end for questions about the use of Zotero in your field of research.

It would be extremely valuable for you to download and familiarize yourself with Zotero in advance of the session. Zotero is free, and works with Chrome, Firefox and Safari.

To do this, please go to Zotero. Download Zotero itself and install the browser connector. You may also find it useful to create an account with Zotero; the benefits of doing so will be outlined during the session.

If you have any difficulty with downloading Zotero in advance, please feel free to contact the course organiser, Helen Murphy, at hem37@cam.ac.uk.

14:00
Beating your final boss battle, or presenting with confidence and style (tough mode) new [Places] 14:00 - 16:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Glass Room

This session will show good presentation design, give tips on good science communication, as well as getting people to think about different tools and ways of presenting their ideas. We will also walk you through hands-on exercises so you can start designing your own slides, as well as get a taste for presenting, all in a safe space.

This is a workshop, hands-on session but if you want to get the quick add-on version, check out our shorter presentation session. While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members.

This session is part of our gaming-themed Moore Methods lunchtime series of talks.

14:30
Metrics: the good, the bad, the ugly new [Places] 14:30 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

This session aims to help you navigate your way through the metrics maze. It will enable you to discover research by using metrics and how metrics can determine online impact.

It will introduce article metrics, personal indicators such as the H-index, and altmetrics. Various tools including Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar and Altmetric will be demonstrated. Please bring your own device if you wish to follow along with the session.

Tuesday 13 March

10:00
Medicine: Literature Searching for Allied Health Professionals new [Places] 10:00 - 12:00 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

One session covering the Cinahl database, targeted at allied health professionals. Learn how to get the best out of your literature searches.

Wednesday 14 March

13:00
Tools to track the impact of your publications on social media new [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Faculty of English, GR04

Collecting impact evidence from social media of publications, conference papers or any other scholarly output can be complicated and time-consuming. In this session, we'll introduce you to a number of tools that can help to streamline and simplify these processes: IFTTT, Twitter analytics, Altmetric and ImpactStory.

14:30
Orientation Tour [Places] 14:30 - 15:15 University Library

The UL is unique: a national, legal deposit library with an amazing collection of around 8 million items - over two million of which you can browse on our open shelves. If that sounds a bit daunting, why not come on a brief orientation tour to help you find your way around? We’ll even tell you what we keep in the famous Library tower ...

Please note this tour does not cover the University's vast electronic and digital collections: to find out more about using these, please see check for courses on our timetable or ask a member of Library staff for help.

Thursday 15 March

10:00
How to nail your literature review new [Standby] 10:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

At some point, everyone doing any research will probably have to do a literature review. This session will guide you through how to do a literature review really well, as well as pulling everything together into a meaningful piece of work that you can present with pride, and use to drive your research further.

14:00
Medicine: Systematic Literature Reviews - A 'How To' Guide [Places] 14:00 - 16:00 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

Before undertaking any piece of primary research it’s important to be aware of as much of the existing literature as possible. A systematic literature review can also be a research end in itself. And it’s not something to be taken lightly. But how can you be sure you’re being as rigorous as necessary? How can you manage the references you find, document the process, and also know when to stop searching?

If you need to do a systematic literature review, and you’re not able to make sense of the search strategy behind this paper then this course is for you. Please bring along details of your own topic so that the session can be tailored to address your specific needs.