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All-provider course timetable

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Mon 17 Feb – Tue 18 Feb

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Monday 17 February

19:00
CULP: Spanish Intermediate 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 19:00 - 21:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 1

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 1 level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: Chinese (Mandarin) Intermediate 1 new charged (12 of 15) CANCELLED 19:00 - 21:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 4

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

More detailed information is available from the Language Centre website.

CULP: Japanese Elementary 2 charged (12 of 15) In progress 19:00 - 21:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 2

The courses are delivered in a blended-learning mode, face-to-face and online through CamTools (the Cambridge University virtual learning environment). The focus is on spoken, oral/aural communicative competence. Students are required to attend to online multimedia materials and read the proscribed texts in their own time so that the classroom time is dedicated to face-to-face communication/discussion.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: German Intermediate 2 charged (12 of 15) In progress 19:00 - 21:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 3

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 2 level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

Tuesday 18 February

09:15
Finance Division Taster Sessions - Accounts Payable & Cashier [Full] 09:15 - 12:15 Finance Division, At Participant's Desk

An opportunity for others within the Finance Division to spend some time with the Accounting Services Team to gain an overview of their roles and a greater appreciation of what they do.

09:30
Lean Practitioner Course new charged (2 of 2) In progress 09:30 - 17:00 Greenwich House, Heidelberg Room
  • This course has been commissioned by ourcambridge and is delivered by a third party company.
  • The course provides an accredited Lean Practitioner qualification. The course involves a 2-day face to face training session followed by completion of a 6-week project.
Access 2016: Creating a Simple Database (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This is an introduction to the popular database package Microsoft Access. The course is aimed at those who have never used the package before or have just started using it. There is an Access Fast Track course that is a shortened version of this course for those who learn at a faster pace.

CULP: French Basic 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 09:30 - 11:30 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 1

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

More detailed information is available from the Language Centre website.

How to write an academic paper and get it published (Life Sciences) [Places] 09:30 - 16:30 Postdoc Centre@ Mill Lane, Seminar Room

The course takes an evidence-based approach to writing. Participants will learn that publishing is a game and the more they understand the rules of the game the higher their chances of becoming publishing authors. They will learn that writing an academic article and getting it published may help with their careers but it does not make them better researchers, or cleverer than they were before their paper was accepted; it simply means they have played the game well.

Suitable for GSLS postgraduates in any discipline who are keen to learn how to write academic papers and articles efficiently as well as more established researchers who have had papers rejected and are not really sure why.

If you want a better chance of your name on a paper, this is for you!

Trainer

Olivia Timbs is an award-winning editor and journalist with over 30 years' experience gained from working on national newspapers and for a range of specialist health and medical journals.

Reproducible Research with R new [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course introduces concepts about reproducibility that can be used when you are programming in R. We will explore how to create notebooks - a way to integrate your R analyses into reports using Rmarkdown. The course also introduces the concept of version control. We will learn how to create a repository on GitHub and how to work together on the same project collaboratively without creating conflicting versions of files.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

10:00
Developing Your Leadership as a PhD Student [Places] 10:00 - 16:30 Student Services Centre, Exams Hall, Room AG03d

Leadership is a word that seems to be ubiquitous in universities these days, but keeping a handle on all its possible meanings is becoming ever harder: research leadership, team leadership, institutional leadership, thought leadership, educational leadership, ethical leadership, inclusive leadership…

Likewise, employers beyond academia repeatedly tell us that they’re seeking researchers who can be self-motivating, proactive, strategic; can build productive relationships with colleagues at all levels of seniority; are able to create consensus and shared understanding; know how to mentor and guide as well as take direction…

So, if leadership is being talked about everywhere and yet is also very hard to define, how can you as a PhD student identify your own leadership practice and your future potential?

This interactive workshop will combine practical insights with key leadership theories in order to explore the ways in which you’re already acting as a leader; to examine how ‘follower’ behaviours have a crucial role in shaping good leadership; and to consider leadership in a variety of contexts.

The session will be led by Jen Wade, a highly experienced trainer who has been leading her own business for more than ten years, working with a diverse range of organisations across the academic, public, and commercial sectors.


Outcomes:

  • Review a range of definitions of, and styles of, leadership.
  • Recognise your current strengths and future potential as a leader.
Beginner's Filmmaking Workshop new (3 of 4) In progress 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Tutors: Sarah McEvoy / Kostas Chondros

Are you curious about making a short documentary film?

This beginner’s filmmaking workshop will help you to start thinking visually and communicate using sound and film. Over two days you will be introduced to different camera shot types, how to construct a basic story, use digital video cameras and sound recorders to shoot your own footage, and then edit a short sequence for export.

The workshop assumes no or very little prior knowledge of filmmaking and no prior preparation is required for the workshop. This is a hands-on practical workshop, working in small teams of two or three people. We expect a willingness to be open to ideas and work in a team to jointly create a short film clip.

The workshop will give you the foundational skills to incorporate film and sound in your own future projects, for example short clips for social media, publicity about research projects as a way to engage wider audiences etc.

During the workshop you will work with dedicated video equipment, but the techniques you will learn can be adapted to film making with smartphones, tablets and other readily available personal electronic devices.

COURSE PROGRAMME

Day 1 – Monday 17th February

  • 10.00 Welcome and introductions
  • 10.30 Aims of the session
  • 10.45 Introduction to shot types, camera movements, framing, telling a story, basic rules of camera use, rules of recording sound
  • 11.45 Splitting into groups – interactive demonstration of how to use the cameras
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Filming around Cambridge, practical exercise working in groups
  • 16.00 Return to room to look at footage from all groups
  • 17.00 Feedback session and summary of day 1 intro to day 2

Day 2 – Tuesday 18th February

We will be working on apple macs and Final Cut X; however we do not expect any prior knowledge of working with either computer or software

  • 10.00 Importing footage onto computers
  • 10.15 Basic editing, creating a 2-minute clip, summary of creating a sequence
  • 10.45 Adding clips to timeline, tools for manipulating clips, using second video track, transitions and filters, syncing audio
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Credits, titles, adjusting audio levels, adding music or narration, exporting footage, saving files
  • 16.00 Looking at each other’s edited clips
  • 16.45 Evaluation
  • 17.00 Finish

Handouts will be emailed after the workshop, and include:

Presentation – shot types, how to construct a sequence Editing on Final Cut x Camera functions, audio recording, info about equipment and editing software and model release forms

What you need to take with you

Headphones – preferably the kind you can plug in rather than Bluetooth headphones

Storage device – if you want to take footage you shoot with you after the workshop, you will need a hard drive, USB or SD card that can hold at least 8GB. Video files are large. Please make sure that the device is formatted to FAT32 if you use it on a PC, as we will be using macs. You can check this by right clicking the device and checking the properties. If you prefer, you don’t need to save the footage that you film and can also upload the exported film to Dropbox.

Upon booking this workshop a questionnaire will be issued to participants which must be completed in order to satisfy the booking.

The workshop is led by:

Sarah McEvoy holds BA Hons Fine Art and an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths University of London and has most recently completed an MA in Art and Design in Education at UCL Institute of Education. Sarah has worked with arts organisations and charities creating short documentaries and has most recently filmed and edited a film working with a socially engaged artist in the community of South East London. As an artist-educator, Sarah works with youth groups and adults with learning disabilities in the community and museums and galleries.

Kostas Chondros holds an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths College, University of London. He also holds an MA in Social Exclusion, Minorities & Gender from Panteion University and a BA in Social Anthropology & History from the University of the Aegean, Greece. Since joining the Personal Histories film production team in 2011, Kostas has filmed several events and taught camera & film production skills. Additionally, as a freelance filmmaker, Kostas documents improvised music performances and collaborates on film projects with other artists and performers. He is also a musician, poet and translator.

How To Nail Your Literature Review 1: Finding What You Need [Full] 10:00 - 11:00 Department of Physics, Maxwell Centre, JJ Thomson Seminar Room (Floor 2)

This session will help prepare you to begin your literature review. You will learn strategies for searching for relevant material, how to troubleshoot common search problems, and how to stay up to date with new publications in your field.

Please bring a laptop, tablet or other web-enabled devide with you to the session.

JTC: 1-to-1 Language Learning Advice new [Full] 10:00 - 10:30 John Trim Centre

A 30 minute appointment with a Language Adviser to explore opportunities and resources to help you with your plans and aims for your language learning. We advise on learning strategies across a range of 180+ languages in our learning centre. Click here to view our current index of languages.

These appointments are for advice on learning languages other than English. Should you want support for language skills in English, please do not book into one of these appointments but send your request to adtis@langcen.cam.ac.uk instead.

(Please note that if you are seeking advice about our taught courses, you are encouraged to drop in to the Language Centre or book early in the term rather than wait for an appointment. See our website for details.)

Advising appointments can be used to:

  • Decide on your short term and longer term goals
  • Discuss learning strategies for independent language study
  • Formulate a personal learning plan
  • Evaluate your progress so far and identify your next steps
  • Tackle more challenging aspects of your language learning, e.g., strategies for developing listening
  • Talk about ways of shaping a self-study session
  • Explore resources in specialist areas
  • Consider how taught course options in Cambridge can fit in to a longer term plan
  • Find out more about intensive language courses abroad
11:00
Social Network Analysis with Digital Data new (3 of 4) In progress 11:00 - 13:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This course will provide a hands-on introduction to the field of Social Network Analysis, giving participants the opportunity to “learn by doing” the process of network data collection and analysis. After being introduced to the basic concepts, the participants will have the opportunity to explore all stages of a social network analysis project, including research design, essential measures, data collection and data analysis. The focus will be on the retrieval of electronic archival data (e.g. websites, digital archives and social media platforms) for non-programmers and on the production of network analysis with specialised software (e.g. Gephi). At the end, the participants will be equipped with the basic tools to perform meaningful visualisations and analyses of network data.

Seeing your name on the spine of a book is a great achievement, which can help to kick start your career in some disciplines. How do you get there?

This session answers some of the key questions along the way, including including:

  • Should you turn your thesis into a monograph?
  • How do you choose a publisher?
  • How do you get your proposal accepted?
  • What are the key stages in the publication process?
JTC: Speaking practice for learners of French [Full] 11:00 - 11:20 John Trim Centre

A chance to practice French conversation/pronunciation with a volunteer native speaker.

Please book no more than 2 sessions per week and not consecutively.

JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Chinese new [Full] 11:00 - 11:20 John Trim Centre

A 20-minute session providing a chance to practice Chinese pronunciation, tones and general conversation.

Green Labs: Carbon Flows in the Lab (CBC) new [Full] 11:00 - 12:00 Clinical School, Seminar Room 14

We know that laboratories use lots of energy, water and resources. We know they produce mountains of waste. We know we can do better. But where should we invest our efforts to improve things?

In this workshop we will help you become more conscious of the carbon flows in your labs and help you identify the worthwhile improvements that you can make.

Please only sign up to one of the sessions. The content will be repeated. Up to 15 participants for each session.

  • Central Cambridge - 11:00-12:00 Mon 17th February 2020, Gurdon Institute, Tennis Court Road
  • Cambridge Biomedical Campus - 11:00-12:00 Tue 18th February 2020, Clinical School
  • West Cambridge - 11:00-12:00 Fri 21st February 2020, Maxwell Centre, JJ Thomson Avenue
11:20
JTC: Speaking practice for learners of French [Full] 11:20 - 11:40 John Trim Centre

A chance to practice French conversation/pronunciation with a volunteer native speaker.

Please book no more than 2 sessions per week and not consecutively.

JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Chinese new [Full] 11:20 - 11:40 John Trim Centre

A 20-minute session providing a chance to practice Chinese pronunciation, tones and general conversation.

11:30
CULP: French Basic for Academic Purposes (LAP) (12 of 15) In progress 11:30 - 13:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 1

Using close reading and translation of academic texts from their particular discipline, this weekly class is intended to help research students in the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences to develop their skills in reading French documents that they have come across or may meet in their research.

The course aims to develop strategies for reading longer texts faster through close analysis, grammatical and stylistic commentary, and translation. For example, literary texts with differing editions, stories with two or more translations into English that need to be compared and evaluated, poems of challenging originality or range of allusion.

Classes will be conducted in English, but there will be many opportunities to use French and practise reading aloud.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: German Basic (total beginners) for Academic Purposes (LAP) (12 of 15) In progress 11:30 - 13:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 4

This weekly class is intended to help research students in the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences to develop their skills in reading German documents they need to deal with in their research. Each session will be divided into two parts:

The first part will consist of grammar, tasks to develop insight into the reading process, help with dealing with complex sentence structures, academic conventions, abbreviations, etc.

The second part will be devoted to the translation of original German texts from different periods and covering a range of topics. Each week you will be asked to attempt a translation into English of a German passage. Students will be encouraged to bring along German texts from their own research to translate.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: German Intermediate 1 for Academic Purposes (LAP) - PRIMARILY FOR CLASSICISTS (12 of 15) In progress 11:30 - 13:00 Faculty of Classics, Room 2.03

PLEASE NOTE: This course is PRIMARILY FOR CLASSICISTS.

This weekly class is intended to help research students in the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences to develop their skills in reading German documents they need to deal with in their research. Each session will be divided into two parts:

The first part will consist of grammar, tasks to develop insight into the reading process, help with dealing with complex sentence structures, academic conventions, abbreviations, etc.

The second part will be devoted to the translation of original German texts from different periods and covering a range of topics. Each week you will be asked to attempt a translation into English of a German passage. Students will be encouraged to bring along German texts from their own research to translate.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

11:40
JTC: Speaking practice for learners of French [Full] 11:40 - 12:00 John Trim Centre

A chance to practice French conversation/pronunciation with a volunteer native speaker.

Please book no more than 2 sessions per week and not consecutively.

JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Chinese new [Full] 11:40 - 12:00 John Trim Centre

A 20-minute session providing a chance to practice Chinese pronunciation, tones and general conversation.

12:00
CULP: Russian Basic 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 12:00 - 14:00 Faculty of English, SR24

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence. At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

More detailed information is available from on our website.

JTC: Advanced English Conversation Hours charged (5 of 6) In progress 12:00 - 13:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 3

The Advanced Conversation Hours are a great way to practice the spoken English of academic discussion and debate. They are suitable for learners comfortable in spoken interaction at level c1 and above. The weekly sessions encourage a relaxed and fun approach to communication designed to both aid interaction and build confidence.

If the course is already 'in progress' please click on 'register your interest' in order to book a place.

Cost for 6 sessions

£31 Students, £41 Staff, £51 Partners and Visiting Scholars

13:00
JTC: Intermediate French Conversation Hour (5 of 6) In progress 13:00 - 14:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 1

If you are an intermediate level learner and would like the chance to improve your speaking skills in a relaxed and informal setting, then this opportunity might interest you.

This year our Intermediate French Conversation Hour will focus on photography. Bring your imagination and curiosity to unravel meaning and ideas from photographs and get a conversation started. Photographs will be brought by the teacher each week. If you are at the stage where you would like to discuss newspaper articles/current affairs, please attend the Advanced Conversation Hour.

Receive feedback on your pronunciation and accuracy, and try stretching yourself further.

Suitable for those who have completed an intermediate 1 French CULP course or those who have a B1 level in the CEFR.

If the course is already 'in progress' please click on 'register your interest' in order to book a place.

CULP: Spanish Intermediate 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 13:00 - 15:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 2

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 1 level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: Chinese (Mandarin) Basic 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 13:00 - 15:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 3

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

JTC: Advanced Spanish Conversation Hours charged (5 of 6) In progress 13:00 - 14:00 Language Centre, Teaching Room 1

This conversation hour offers learners with an independent conversational ability (B2/C1 level upwards) a chance to practice speaking Spanish with others in a relaxed and informal group led by a native-speaker facilitator. The content of the sessions is decided by the participants, with members taking turns to propose a topic and source materials (newspaper articles, web links, videos etc.) to use as a basis for discussion. The groups are ideal for those who wish to retain or improve upon the language skills they already have or for those studying for a language degree who would like another forum for interaction at advanced level.

Participants from Spanish Advanced CULP and Advanced plus through film and literature are warmly invited to attend the Spanish Conversation Hour.

If the course is already 'in progress' please click on 'register your interest' in order to book a place.

Finance Division Knowledge Bites - Finance Business Transformation Project update new CANCELLED 13:00 - 13:45 Greenwich House, Cairo Room

An update on progress of the Finance Business Transformation Programme (FBTP), a large scale initiative which aims to shape and enhance Finance’s processes and tools of the future. Those working in Finance roles and all users of Finance services will be crucial to making the programme a success and, as well as giving you the chance to learn about the FBTP progress during this session, we would also welcome your views and thoughts.

MMLL Library: Getting Started With Zotero new [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages - Room 326

This session is designed to introduce MMLL undergraduates to Zotero, a referencing software especially suited to the Arts & Humanities. Topics covered include how to install the software for free, saving citations, creating bibliographies and annotated bibliographies, shared libraries, and a number of user tips.

Finance Division Knowledge Bites - Pensions new [Places] 13:00 - 13:45 Greenwich House, Cairo Room

An opportunity to gain an insight into the work of the pensions section, gain an understanding of pension basics and discover how valuable your University pension is to you.

14:00
Further Topics in Multivariate Analysis (FTMA) 1 (3 of 4) Not bookable 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This module is an extension of the three previous modules in the Basic Statistics stream, and introduces more complex and nuanced aspects of the theory and practice of mutivariate analysis. Students will learn the theory behind the methods covered, how to implement them in practice, how to interpret their results, and how to write intelligently about their findings. Half of the module is based in the lecture theatre; the other half is lab-based, in which students will work through practical exercises using the statistical software Stata.

Topics covered include:

  • Interaction effects in regression models: how to estimate these and how to interpret them
  • Marginal effects from interacted models
  • Ordered and categorical discrete dependent variable models (ordered and multinomial logit and probit)

To get the most out of the course, you should also expect to spend some time between sessions building your own statistical models.

Moodle: Training for Coordinators [Places] 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Moodle as the Virtual Learning Environment will be supporting teaching and learning at the University.

This is an advanced course for those who manage categories in Moodle and would like to learn more about existing features, such as permissions, cohorts, and course history.

Qualitative Interviews with Vulnerable Groups new (2 of 3) In progress 14:00 - 16:00 Institute of Criminology, Room B3

Qualitative interviews are often used in the social sciences to learn more about the world and can be particularly appropriate for people we might class as vulnerable. The course will try to achieve two things. First, it will have a strong practical arc, guiding students through the complete process of designing and delivering interviews and what to do with the data when you have it. It is particularly important, therefore, that students come to the course prepared with a research question in mind (it does not have to be your actual dissertation topic). Second, we will repeatedly think carefully about the challenges of interviewing with populations that are deemed vulnerable (especially prisoners, women in the criminal justice system, and people living with trauma). We will explore how, in all stages of the research cycle, questions of ethics and the importance of understanding ‘whole people’ remain pertinent.

In the first session we will think about how to frame a study and research question, and how to design an interview schedule that allows you to access your question sensibly and creatively! We will also think about the challenges of interviewing those with trauma, in particular, as a case study.

In the second session we will think through the challenges of actually undertaking interviews in the field. Many hints and tip will be shared, and students will be encouraged to undertake a short mock interview.

In the third session we explore various ways in which to approach a mass of interview data and different approaches towards analysis.

In the final session, we burrow down into analysis and talk about how to write up your research.

In both of the final sessions students will be asked to engage with real interview transcripts that have been anonymised.

Writing your first year report (Engineering RDC Division A: Energy & Division C) new Not bookable 14:00 - 17:00 Department of Engineering, Lecture Room 3B

« Description not available »

Further Topics in Multivariate Analysis (FTMA) 2 (2 of 3) Not bookable 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This module is an extension of the three previous modules in the Basic Statistics stream, and introduces more complex and nuanced aspects of the theory and practice of mutivariate analysis. Students will learn the theory behind the methods covered, how to implement them in practice, how to interpret their results, and how to write intelligently about their findings. Half of the module is based in the lecture theatre; the other half is lab-based, in which students will work through practical exercises using the statistical software Stata.

Topics covered include:

  • Interaction effects in regression models: how to estimate these and how to interpret them
  • Marginal effects from interacted models
  • Ordered and categorical discrete dependent variable models (ordered and multinomial logit and probit)

To get the most out of the course, you should also expect to spend some time between sessions building your own statistical models.

Beginner's Filmmaking Workshop new (4 of 4) In progress 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Tutors: Sarah McEvoy / Kostas Chondros

Are you curious about making a short documentary film?

This beginner’s filmmaking workshop will help you to start thinking visually and communicate using sound and film. Over two days you will be introduced to different camera shot types, how to construct a basic story, use digital video cameras and sound recorders to shoot your own footage, and then edit a short sequence for export.

The workshop assumes no or very little prior knowledge of filmmaking and no prior preparation is required for the workshop. This is a hands-on practical workshop, working in small teams of two or three people. We expect a willingness to be open to ideas and work in a team to jointly create a short film clip.

The workshop will give you the foundational skills to incorporate film and sound in your own future projects, for example short clips for social media, publicity about research projects as a way to engage wider audiences etc.

During the workshop you will work with dedicated video equipment, but the techniques you will learn can be adapted to film making with smartphones, tablets and other readily available personal electronic devices.

COURSE PROGRAMME

Day 1 – Monday 17th February

  • 10.00 Welcome and introductions
  • 10.30 Aims of the session
  • 10.45 Introduction to shot types, camera movements, framing, telling a story, basic rules of camera use, rules of recording sound
  • 11.45 Splitting into groups – interactive demonstration of how to use the cameras
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Filming around Cambridge, practical exercise working in groups
  • 16.00 Return to room to look at footage from all groups
  • 17.00 Feedback session and summary of day 1 intro to day 2

Day 2 – Tuesday 18th February

We will be working on apple macs and Final Cut X; however we do not expect any prior knowledge of working with either computer or software

  • 10.00 Importing footage onto computers
  • 10.15 Basic editing, creating a 2-minute clip, summary of creating a sequence
  • 10.45 Adding clips to timeline, tools for manipulating clips, using second video track, transitions and filters, syncing audio
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Credits, titles, adjusting audio levels, adding music or narration, exporting footage, saving files
  • 16.00 Looking at each other’s edited clips
  • 16.45 Evaluation
  • 17.00 Finish

Handouts will be emailed after the workshop, and include:

Presentation – shot types, how to construct a sequence Editing on Final Cut x Camera functions, audio recording, info about equipment and editing software and model release forms

What you need to take with you

Headphones – preferably the kind you can plug in rather than Bluetooth headphones

Storage device – if you want to take footage you shoot with you after the workshop, you will need a hard drive, USB or SD card that can hold at least 8GB. Video files are large. Please make sure that the device is formatted to FAT32 if you use it on a PC, as we will be using macs. You can check this by right clicking the device and checking the properties. If you prefer, you don’t need to save the footage that you film and can also upload the exported film to Dropbox.

Upon booking this workshop a questionnaire will be issued to participants which must be completed in order to satisfy the booking.

The workshop is led by:

Sarah McEvoy holds BA Hons Fine Art and an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths University of London and has most recently completed an MA in Art and Design in Education at UCL Institute of Education. Sarah has worked with arts organisations and charities creating short documentaries and has most recently filmed and edited a film working with a socially engaged artist in the community of South East London. As an artist-educator, Sarah works with youth groups and adults with learning disabilities in the community and museums and galleries.

Kostas Chondros holds an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths College, University of London. He also holds an MA in Social Exclusion, Minorities & Gender from Panteion University and a BA in Social Anthropology & History from the University of the Aegean, Greece. Since joining the Personal Histories film production team in 2011, Kostas has filmed several events and taught camera & film production skills. Additionally, as a freelance filmmaker, Kostas documents improvised music performances and collaborates on film projects with other artists and performers. He is also a musician, poet and translator.

15:00
CULP: Spanish Advanced charged (12 of 15) In progress 15:00 - 17:00 Language Centre, Teaching Room 3

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At an advanced level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

One of the aims of the advanced level courses is also presentation skills as the courses aim to cater to the academic needs (i.e. research, conferences) of the students.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

NB: Advanced courses are official, award-bearing University qualifications.

Please also note that the certificates and transcripts are usually issued in July.

CULP: Chinese (Mandarin) Basic 2 charged (12 of 15) In progress 15:00 - 17:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 3

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: Arabic Basic 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 15:00 - 17:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 2

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: Spanish Basic for Academic Purposes (LAP) (12 of 15) In progress 15:00 - 16:30 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 4

Using close reading and translation of academic texts from their particular discipline, this weekly class is intended to help research students in the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences to develop their skills in reading Spanish documents that they have come across or may meet in their research.

The course aims to develop strategies for reading longer texts faster through close analysis, grammatical and stylistic commentary, and translation. For example, literary texts with differing editions, stories with two or more translations into English that need to be compared and evaluated, poems of challenging originality or range of allusion.

Classes will be conducted in English, but there will be many opportunities to use Spanish and practise reading aloud.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: German Basic 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 15:00 - 17:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 1

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

JTC: 1-to-1 Language Learning Advice new [Full] 15:00 - 15:30 John Trim Centre

A 30 minute appointment with a Language Adviser to explore opportunities and resources to help you with your plans and aims for your language learning. We advise on learning strategies across a range of 180+ languages in our learning centre. Click here to view our current index of languages.

These appointments are for advice on learning languages other than English. Should you want support for language skills in English, please do not book into one of these appointments but send your request to adtis@langcen.cam.ac.uk instead.

(Please note that if you are seeking advice about our taught courses, you are encouraged to drop in to the Language Centre or book early in the term rather than wait for an appointment. See our website for details.)

Advising appointments can be used to:

  • Decide on your short term and longer term goals
  • Discuss learning strategies for independent language study
  • Formulate a personal learning plan
  • Evaluate your progress so far and identify your next steps
  • Tackle more challenging aspects of your language learning, e.g., strategies for developing listening
  • Talk about ways of shaping a self-study session
  • Explore resources in specialist areas
  • Consider how taught course options in Cambridge can fit in to a longer term plan
  • Find out more about intensive language courses abroad
JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Japanese [Full] 15:00 - 15:20 John Trim Centre

A one-to-one practice speaking session with a volunteer native Japanese speaker

15:20
JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Japanese [Places] 15:20 - 15:40 John Trim Centre

A one-to-one practice speaking session with a volunteer native Japanese speaker

15:30
Ethnographic Methods (3 of 4) In progress 15:30 - 17:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 2

This module is an introduction to ethnographic fieldwork and analysis and is intended for students in fields other than anthropology. It provides an introduction to contemporary debates in ethnography, and an outline of how selected methods may be used in ethnographic study.

The ethnographic method was originally developed in the field of social anthropology, but has grown in popularity across several disciplines, including sociology, geography, criminology, education and organization studies.

Ethnographic research is a largely qualitative method, based upon participant observation among small samples of people for extended periods. A community of research participants might be defined on the basis of ethnicity, geography, language, social class, or on the basis of membership of a group or organization. An ethnographer aims to engage closely with the culture and experiences of their research participants, to produce a holistic analysis of their fieldsite.


Session 1: The Ethnographic Method
What is ethnography? Can ethnographic research and writing be objective? How does one conduct ethnographic research responsibly and ethically?

Session 2: Photography and Audio Recording in Ethnographic Work
What kinds of audiovisual equipment, and practices of photography and sound recording, can be used to support an ethnographer’s research process? What kinds of the epistemological, theoretical, social, and ethical considerations tend to arise around possible use of these technologies in anthropological fieldwork and analysis?

Session 3: Relationships in the Field
Ethnographic methodology and participant observation often involve researchers’ positioning in existing networks of social relations. This session is meant to help attendees manage interpersonal relationships with research participants from academic, political, and ethical perspectives. We will discuss when and why relationships in ethnographic fieldwork can be a reason for concern. We will reflect on the social distinctions that emerge when doing fieldwork with other people and their effects on researchers’ decision-making process. Finally, we will think through different fieldwork strategies when working with others, and how they impact the production of ethnographic knowledge.

Session 4: Defining the Fieldsite
This session is meant to equip attendees with the practical skill of how to determine, or work with, the limits of the fieldsite. Drawing on reflections on the challenges of working across sprawling geographical fields, as well as more enclosed geographical sites, we will discuss strategies for either strategically bounding the seemingly infinite fieldsite, or letting the boundaries of an already limited one work for you. We will also discuss how this methodological decision might impact the theoretical insights that emerge from a period of fieldwork, as well as how it impacts the interview process, methods of participant observation, and strategies for developing relationships with gatekeepers and interlocutors

PLEASE NOTE: Update on additional teaching - we have now scheduled the two additional sessions on 18 and 25 February. Further information on their content will follow.

JTC: 1-to-1 Language Learning Advice new [Full] 15:30 - 16:00 John Trim Centre

A 30 minute appointment with a Language Adviser to explore opportunities and resources to help you with your plans and aims for your language learning. We advise on learning strategies across a range of 180+ languages in our learning centre. Click here to view our current index of languages.

These appointments are for advice on learning languages other than English. Should you want support for language skills in English, please do not book into one of these appointments but send your request to adtis@langcen.cam.ac.uk instead.

(Please note that if you are seeking advice about our taught courses, you are encouraged to drop in to the Language Centre or book early in the term rather than wait for an appointment. See our website for details.)

Advising appointments can be used to:

  • Decide on your short term and longer term goals
  • Discuss learning strategies for independent language study
  • Formulate a personal learning plan
  • Evaluate your progress so far and identify your next steps
  • Tackle more challenging aspects of your language learning, e.g., strategies for developing listening
  • Talk about ways of shaping a self-study session
  • Explore resources in specialist areas
  • Consider how taught course options in Cambridge can fit in to a longer term plan
  • Find out more about intensive language courses abroad
15:40
JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Japanese [Places] 15:40 - 16:00 John Trim Centre

A one-to-one practice speaking session with a volunteer native Japanese speaker

16:00
Further Topics in Multivariate Analysis (FTMA) 1 (4 of 4) Not bookable 16:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This module is an extension of the three previous modules in the Basic Statistics stream, and introduces more complex and nuanced aspects of the theory and practice of mutivariate analysis. Students will learn the theory behind the methods covered, how to implement them in practice, how to interpret their results, and how to write intelligently about their findings. Half of the module is based in the lecture theatre; the other half is lab-based, in which students will work through practical exercises using the statistical software Stata.

Topics covered include:

  • Interaction effects in regression models: how to estimate these and how to interpret them
  • Marginal effects from interacted models
  • Ordered and categorical discrete dependent variable models (ordered and multinomial logit and probit)

To get the most out of the course, you should also expect to spend some time between sessions building your own statistical models.

16:30
CULP: German Advanced charged (12 of 15) In progress 16:30 - 18:30 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 4

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At an advanced level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

One of the aims of the advanced level courses is also presentation skills as the courses aim to cater to the academic needs (i.e. research, conferences) of the students.

More detailed information is available from the Language Centre website.

NB: Advanced courses are official, award-bearing University qualifications.

Please also note that the certificates and transcripts are usually issued in July.

17:00
CULP: Russian Advanced charged (12 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages, Room 207

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At an advanced level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

One of the aims of the advanced level courses is also presentation skills as the courses aim to cater to the academic needs (i.e. research, conferences) of the students.

More detailed information is available from the Language Centre webiste.

NB: Advanced courses are official, award-bearing University qualifications.

Please also note that the certificates and transcripts are usually issued in July.

CULP: Arabic Elementary 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 2

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

More detailed information is available from the Language Centre.

CULP: Spanish Advanced Plus through Film and Literature charged (12 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 Language Centre, Teaching Room 3

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At advanced level the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

One of the aims of the advanced level courses is also presentation skills as the courses aim to cater for the academic needs (i.e. research, conferences) of the students.

This course features no formal summative assessment component and upon the completion of homework, participation and attendance (attendance required is at least 12/15 sessions) students will be awarded a Certificate of Attendance issued by the Language Centre.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: Korean Basic 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Room 7

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At basic 1 level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: Greek Basic 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages - Room 332

Greek is an Indo-European language and the only member of the Hellenic branch; it has been spoken in South-East Europe since early in the second millennium BC and has the longest recorded history of any Indo-European language. Ancient Greek, spanning from c. 1500 BC to 1600 AD and Modern Greek (c.1700 to the present) are two major developmental stages in the long history of the language.

Modern Greek is spoken by some 14 million people mainly in the Republic of Greece, where it is the official language and the Republic of Cyprus as one of the two official languages. It is also spoken by sizeable immigrant communities in the USA, Australia, Western Europe and elsewhere. Since 1981 is has been one of the official languages of the European Union as well.

More detailed information is available from the Language Centre website.

CULP: Spanish Basic 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 3

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: Spanish Basic 2 - SEMI-INTENSIVE charged (10 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 Faculty of History, Seminar Room 1

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: German Intermediate 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 Faculty of History, Seminar Room 11

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 1 level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please go to the Language Centre CULP page.

CULP: Introduction to the Persian (Farsi) Language and Culture charged (12 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Room 214

The Introduction to Languages and Cultures courses feature some less taught languages and are designed to offer a sneak preview into the world of these important civilisations.

While learning the basics of the language, you will be able to view and appreciate the ancient as well as the modern character of the lands and peoples.

These courses will not be formally assessed and students who attend regularly (12/15 sessions) will receive a Certificate of Attendance.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: British Sign Language Basic 1 new charged (12 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 1

The course is delivered in a visual way

JTC: Speaking Practice for learners of Arabic new [Full] 17:00 - 17:20 John Trim Centre

Speaking practice with an Arabic native-speaker volunteer

17:15
JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Italian [Full] 17:15 - 17:35 John Trim Centre

Speaking practice with an Italian native-speaker volunteer.

17:20
JTC: Speaking Practice for learners of Arabic new [Full] 17:20 - 17:40 John Trim Centre

Speaking practice with an Arabic native-speaker volunteer

17:35
JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Italian [Places] 17:35 - 17:55 John Trim Centre

Speaking practice with an Italian native-speaker volunteer.

17:40
JTC: Speaking Practice for learners of Arabic new [Full] 17:40 - 18:00 John Trim Centre

Speaking practice with an Arabic native-speaker volunteer

17:55
JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Italian [Places] 17:55 - 18:15 John Trim Centre

Speaking practice with an Italian native-speaker volunteer.

19:00
CULP: French Advanced Plus charged (12 of 15) In progress 19:00 - 21:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 4

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At an advanced level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

One of the aims of the advanced level courses is also presentation skills as the courses aim to cater to the academic needs (i.e. research, conferences) of the students.

More detailed information is available on our website.

CULP: Japanese Intermediate 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 19:00 - 21:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 2

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence. At intermediate 1 level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please go to the Language Centre CULP page.

CULP: French Intermediate 2 charged (12 of 15) In progress 19:00 - 21:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 1

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 2 level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

More detailed information is available on our website.

CULP: German Basic 1 charged (12 of 15) In progress 19:00 - 21:00 Faculty of History, Seminar Room 1

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.