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Sun 21 Jan – Wed 7 Feb

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Tuesday 23 January

10:00
EndNote: Introduction to a Reference Management Program (Self-paced) [Places] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

An introduction to using the bibliography program EndNote to store references and notes and use them to achieve correct referencing in your documents without re-typing. This course covers both EndNote Desktop and the free, browser based, "lite" version, EndNote Online.

Using EndNote will enable you to keep a note of references as you research online so that you will always be able to document your sources correctly. It can save you time as you should never need to retype references and you can alter their layout with a couple of mouse-clicks.

Wednesday 24 January

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (3 of 4) In progress 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming and provides an introduction to programming using Python, focussing on scientific programming. This course is probably unsuitable for those with programming experience, even if it is just in shell scripting or Matlab-like programs. By the end of this course, attendees should be able to write simple Python programs and to understand more complex Python programs written by others.

As this course is part of the Scientific Computing series, the examples chosen are of most relevance to scientific programming.

10:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (1 of 2) [Standby] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

14:00
C++: Programming in Modern C++ (4 of 6) In progress 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This is an introduction to programming in modern C++, based on the book "'Programming: Principles and Practice using C++"' (2nd ed.) by Bjarne Stroustrup. The aim is to teach participants how to write non trivial, practical programs that are comprehensible and portable. Participants should also be able to understand and modify most well-written C++ applications, though not necessarily every aspect of them.

C++ is a large and complicated language, which is reflected in the length of this course. The creator of C++, Prof. Stroustrup, estimates that newcomers to programming will have to devote in excess of 200 hours' of work to learn how to program in C++ properly. Please bear that in mind if signing up for the course. It would also be of help (though not essential) if attendees have some prior programming experience in another language, e.g. Python.

Excel 2016: Introduction (Self-paced) (1 of 2) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

Microsoft Excel is the chosen spreadsheet package as it is a popular choice, both on Macintosh and PC. This is a self-paced Excel Beginners course for those who prefer to learn at their own pace, there is an instructor present to support you if you have questions. The same course is taught as instructor-led for those who prefer this approach to learning Excel Introduction .

Word 2016: Introduction (Self-paced) (1 of 2) Not bookable 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This self-paced practical course covers the most commonly used features of Microsoft Word and is suited to complete beginners or those with limited experience of using a word processor.

LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (2 of 2) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

Thursday 25 January

09:30
Access 2016: Creating a Simple Database (1 of 2) [Standby] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This is an introduction to the popular database package Microsoft Access. The course is aimed at those who have never used the package before or have just started using it. There is an Access Fast Track course that is a shortened version of this course for those who learn at a faster pace.

14:00
Excel 2016: Introduction (Self-paced) (2 of 2) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

Microsoft Excel is the chosen spreadsheet package as it is a popular choice, both on Macintosh and PC. This is a self-paced Excel Beginners course for those who prefer to learn at their own pace, there is an instructor present to support you if you have questions. The same course is taught as instructor-led for those who prefer this approach to learning Excel Introduction .

Word 2016: Introduction (Self-paced) (2 of 2) Not bookable 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This self-paced practical course covers the most commonly used features of Microsoft Word and is suited to complete beginners or those with limited experience of using a word processor.

Friday 26 January

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (4 of 4) In progress 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming and provides an introduction to programming using Python, focussing on scientific programming. This course is probably unsuitable for those with programming experience, even if it is just in shell scripting or Matlab-like programs. By the end of this course, attendees should be able to write simple Python programs and to understand more complex Python programs written by others.

As this course is part of the Scientific Computing series, the examples chosen are of most relevance to scientific programming.

Access 2016: Creating a Simple Database (2 of 2) [Standby] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This is an introduction to the popular database package Microsoft Access. The course is aimed at those who have never used the package before or have just started using it. There is an Access Fast Track course that is a shortened version of this course for those who learn at a faster pace.

NVivo: An Introduction for Qualitative Research [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course will introduce NVivo a Computer Aided Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS) which supports qualitative and mixed methods research. It provides a means to collect, organise and analyse content from interviews, focus group discussions, surveys and audio.

Tuesday 30 January

09:30
Adobe Photoshop CC: Introduction (Level 1) (1 of 2) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Adobe Photoshop CC is the latest version of the favourite image manipulation and editing tool of the professional graphics industry and photographers. It enables digital and scanned-in photographs, pictures and graphics files to be edited and offers a dazzling array of drawing, special effects and filtering tools. Knowing where to start with such a comprehensive and feature-filled package can be daunting. This presentation aims to equip new users with the basics, using live demonstrations throughout.

Save Time and Increase Your Productivity with Dragon NaturallySpeaking [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Countless busy professionals are now turning to speech recognition to speed up creating documents and streamlining their workflow.

This course will focus on how to use Dragon NaturallySpeaking for education to improve accuracy and will show you how to customise the software for your writing style.

The aim of this course is to teach you how to achieve 99% accuracy with Dragon NaturallySpeaking so that you spend less time correcting mis-recognitions and more time dictating text at speeds of up to 140 words per minute!

With Dragon you are only limited to the speed you can think - come and learn how get Dragon working for you!

See success stories of how Dragon is being used by education.

Wednesday 31 January

09:30
Adobe Photoshop CC: Introduction (Level 1) (2 of 2) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Adobe Photoshop CC is the latest version of the favourite image manipulation and editing tool of the professional graphics industry and photographers. It enables digital and scanned-in photographs, pictures and graphics files to be edited and offers a dazzling array of drawing, special effects and filtering tools. Knowing where to start with such a comprehensive and feature-filled package can be daunting. This presentation aims to equip new users with the basics, using live demonstrations throughout.

14:00
C++: Programming in Modern C++ (5 of 6) In progress 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This is an introduction to programming in modern C++, based on the book "'Programming: Principles and Practice using C++"' (2nd ed.) by Bjarne Stroustrup. The aim is to teach participants how to write non trivial, practical programs that are comprehensible and portable. Participants should also be able to understand and modify most well-written C++ applications, though not necessarily every aspect of them.

C++ is a large and complicated language, which is reflected in the length of this course. The creator of C++, Prof. Stroustrup, estimates that newcomers to programming will have to devote in excess of 200 hours' of work to learn how to program in C++ properly. Please bear that in mind if signing up for the course. It would also be of help (though not essential) if attendees have some prior programming experience in another language, e.g. Python.

Thursday 1 February

14:00
MySQL: Implementing a Relational Database Design (1 of 2) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This beginners course equips you with the skills to implement a relational database design entity relationship diagram (ERD) into a MySQL database. Please be prepared for a fast paced course, but the materials provided can be used for consolidation after the course.

Word 2016: Mastering Dissertations and Theses (Level 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is mainly aimed at students writing their thesis. It is a task-focused version of the Word: Mastering Advanced Features which is aimed at staff creating reports. Please do not book yourself on both courses. It is designed to give a overview of the advanced features of Microsoft Word that are most relevant to producing dissertations, theses and other long documents.

Friday 2 February

09:30
MySQL: Implementing a Relational Database Design (2 of 2) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This beginners course equips you with the skills to implement a relational database design entity relationship diagram (ERD) into a MySQL database. Please be prepared for a fast paced course, but the materials provided can be used for consolidation after the course.

Monday 5 February

10:00
IT Supporters: Training for the New Password App (1 of 2) [Standby] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

A full day course for Computer Officers on the UIS password application and the skills they will need to use it. Major topics covered include:

  • Computing Service policies regarding UIS accounts
  • Privacy briefing covering the legal status of UIS accounts and your obligations to users
  • Assertiveness training to assist you in dealing with problematic requests
  • Demonstration of the new password application
  • Online test

This course includes descriptions of the circumstances under which you may, and more importantly, may not give out account details (including password reset tokens). The examples and scenarios used are based on actual requests and incidents, and includes some content that could be distressing. This material is specifically included to ensure that Computer Officers are aware of the social engineering techniques that have been used in attempts to gain access to accounts, often under difficult and stressful circumstances. This is intended to assist you in developing the skills to deal appropriately with such situations if they occur within your own institution and forms an essential part of the course.

Successful completion of this course and the online exam is mandatory for Computer Officers wishing to have password resetting authority using the UIS password application for a range of University wide services including Hermes, Raven and the MCS.

14:00
Adobe InDesign CC: Introduction to Desktop Publishing [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site
  • Adobe InDesign CC is the industry leading page design and layout application. You will build up a publication from ready-prepared text, images and graphics in the same way as QuarkXpress and PageMaker.
IT Supporters: Training for the New Password App (2 of 2) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

A full day course for Computer Officers on the UIS password application and the skills they will need to use it. Major topics covered include:

  • Computing Service policies regarding UIS accounts
  • Privacy briefing covering the legal status of UIS accounts and your obligations to users
  • Assertiveness training to assist you in dealing with problematic requests
  • Demonstration of the new password application
  • Online test

This course includes descriptions of the circumstances under which you may, and more importantly, may not give out account details (including password reset tokens). The examples and scenarios used are based on actual requests and incidents, and includes some content that could be distressing. This material is specifically included to ensure that Computer Officers are aware of the social engineering techniques that have been used in attempts to gain access to accounts, often under difficult and stressful circumstances. This is intended to assist you in developing the skills to deal appropriately with such situations if they occur within your own institution and forms an essential part of the course.

Successful completion of this course and the online exam is mandatory for Computer Officers wishing to have password resetting authority using the UIS password application for a range of University wide services including Hermes, Raven and the MCS.

Tuesday 6 February

09:30
Excel 2016: Managing Data & Lists [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Wednesday 7 February

10:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (1 of 2) [Standby] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

14:00
C++: Programming in Modern C++ (6 of 6) In progress 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This is an introduction to programming in modern C++, based on the book "'Programming: Principles and Practice using C++"' (2nd ed.) by Bjarne Stroustrup. The aim is to teach participants how to write non trivial, practical programs that are comprehensible and portable. Participants should also be able to understand and modify most well-written C++ applications, though not necessarily every aspect of them.

C++ is a large and complicated language, which is reflected in the length of this course. The creator of C++, Prof. Stroustrup, estimates that newcomers to programming will have to devote in excess of 200 hours' of work to learn how to program in C++ properly. Please bear that in mind if signing up for the course. It would also be of help (though not essential) if attendees have some prior programming experience in another language, e.g. Python.

LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (2 of 2) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.