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University Information Services course timetable

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Sat 24 Feb – Fri 9 Mar

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Monday 26 February

14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (1 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Tuesday 27 February

09:30
Adobe Photoshop CC: Advanced (Level 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Following on from the Photoshop CC: Introduction (Level 1) course, this course covers some of the more advanced features of Adobe Photoshop CC, which is the latest version of the popular image manipulation and editing tool for graphics and design professionals and photographers. The course will explore some of the more advanced features of Photoshop. Techniques will be explained and demonstrated, and participants will then be given the opportunity to practice these for themselves.

14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (2 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Wednesday 28 February

09:30
Unix: Introduction to the Command Line Interface (Self-paced) (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The course is designed to take someone from having no knowledge of the Unix command line to being able to navigate around directories, and doing simple file manipulation. Then some of the more basic commands, will be introduced, including information on how to get more help from the system itself. Finally accessing remote computers by ssh and the most basic of shell scripts will be introduced.

14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (3 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

14:15
TechLink Community Seminar: WiFi and Beyond: Wireless Systems Update new [Places] 14:15 - 16:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Norwich Room

This seminar will explore and explain the changes that have been made to the Wireless system, across University institutions and across the city, over the past 12 months. It will also detail some of the plans for the next 6-12 months, as well as preview some of the new services we are hoping to offer in the future.

Presenters

  • Alexander Cox, Service Manager of University Wireless Infrastructure
  • Gordon Ross, University Telecoms System Manager

Thursday 1 March

09:30
Unix: Introduction to the Command Line Interface (Self-paced) (2 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The course is designed to take someone from having no knowledge of the Unix command line to being able to navigate around directories, and doing simple file manipulation. Then some of the more basic commands, will be introduced, including information on how to get more help from the system itself. Finally accessing remote computers by ssh and the most basic of shell scripts will be introduced.

Excel 2016: Functions [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course covers some of the more challenging functions such as IF, SUMIFS and VLOOKUP. Not all chapters will be taught in full due to time constraints but are included for self-study.

Analysing Business Processes: Where Do I Start? new [Full] 09:30 - 11:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Huntingdon Room

This short session will provide an understanding of the principles, tools and techniques involved in Process Analysis with a view to improving business process effectiveness and efficiency. Delegates will have the opportunity to practice using the techniques that they learn via exercises designed to be enjoyable and thought provoking.

The course refers to the methodology used in conjunction with Triaster process mapping software available to users across the University of Cambridge.

10:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (1 of 2) [Places] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

10:30
Drupal: An Introduction [Places] 10:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course will cover the most essential features and concepts of Drupal Content Management Service through hands on activities.

14:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (2 of 2) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

Friday 2 March

09:00
UTBS: New Provider Training Manager Training [Places] 09:00 - 12:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is designed for the Training Manager(s) of a new provider on the University Training Booking System. (UTBS) and it will take them through theory and practicals on how to manage their training programme on the UTBS

09:30
Web Authoring: HTML - Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) for Beginners (Level 2) [Standby] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This is a practical-based course for anyone with a basic understanding of HTML. The course will introduce Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and show how they can (and should) be used effectively when creating web pages. The course teaches how to write CSS from scratch using a basic Text Editor. By the end of the course participants will have adapted a small website consisting of three pages so that it is styled using a single Cascading Style Sheet. Course participants will have the opportunity to publish these using DS-Web.

Monday 5 March

14:00
Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (1 of 3) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.

Tuesday 6 March

09:30
Microsoft SharePoint 2013/Online: For Your Institution [Full] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course introduces the features of SharePoint 2013 and SharePoint Online which are part of the University's Microsoft EES Agreement.

It's aim to cover topics that will assist institutions in evaluating SharePoint 2013 or Online for their institutional requirements.

During the course there will be discussion on how to improve attendees work process using SharePoint fro existing users.

PHP: From Basics to Data Collection through a Webform (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This PHP introduction course explores the basic elements of PHP script programming. PHP allows web developers to write dynamic web pages, for instance by simplifying ways to collect data through a web form, and to process and include data, by placing small scripts directly into HTML files.

Session 1 will provide background, tools and exercises for writing and editing PHP in HTML files, uploading them to a web server, and making them available online. There will also be an introduction to programming in PHP, to help enable you to later adapt the examples to address your more advanced examples and projects.

Session 2 will extend the simpler exercises in Session 1, adding more options and capabilities, as well as providing new and more advanced examples. Using the tools and techniques from Session 1, there will be opportunities to adjust and partly customise the examples, and if time permits potentially begin a small exercise of your own.

Wednesday 7 March

09:30
Python 3: Advanced Topics (Self-paced) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series and is suitable for people who have Python experience equivalent to either of the introductory courses: Introduction for Absolute Beginners or Introduction for Programmers

These sessions consist of a selection of self-paced mini-courses, each taking at most a half-day. Python expert(s) from the UCS will be present to answer questions or address difficulties with these. Attendees can select from the available topics to most closely meet their individual needs. Attendees are welcome to attend more than one session to work through multiple topics. If an attendee finishes a topic with time to spare they may select another, and so on.

PHP: From Basics to Data Collection through a Webform (2 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This PHP introduction course explores the basic elements of PHP script programming. PHP allows web developers to write dynamic web pages, for instance by simplifying ways to collect data through a web form, and to process and include data, by placing small scripts directly into HTML files.

Session 1 will provide background, tools and exercises for writing and editing PHP in HTML files, uploading them to a web server, and making them available online. There will also be an introduction to programming in PHP, to help enable you to later adapt the examples to address your more advanced examples and projects.

Session 2 will extend the simpler exercises in Session 1, adding more options and capabilities, as well as providing new and more advanced examples. Using the tools and techniques from Session 1, there will be opportunities to adjust and partly customise the examples, and if time permits potentially begin a small exercise of your own.

14:00
Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (2 of 3) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.

Thursday 8 March

09:30
Falcon: An Introduction for Content and Site Managers (Part 1 and Part 2) (1 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course will cover the use of Falcon Content Management Service by content and site managers.

10:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (1 of 2) [Standby] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

14:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (2 of 2) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

Friday 9 March

09:30
Falcon: An Introduction for Content and Site Managers (Part 1 and Part 2) (2 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course will cover the use of Falcon Content Management Service by content and site managers.

14:00
Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (3 of 3) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.