skip to navigation skip to content

Librarians in Training

Librarians in Training course timetable

Show:

Thu 23 May 2019 – Wed 25 Mar

Now Today



May 2019

Thu 23
Librarians in Training: Working with Students with Mental Health Conditions in the Library new Finished 14:30 - 16:30 Student Services Centre, Exams Hall, Room AG03d

This participative workshop will include a discussion of the barriers for students with mental health difficulties using the library, and reminders about the support available outside the library services. Through discussion of case studies we will look at improving practice with students with mental health difficulties and improve the understanding of common diagnostic labels.

June 2019

Mon 10
Librarians in Training: Activate Your Teaching – How to Use Active Learning for Maximum Engagement new Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Cambridge University Library, Milstein Room

Everyone wants their teaching to be as engaging and successful as possible, right? But how often have we found ourselves talking to a group of students from behind a podium and thinking “there must be a better way to get this group more involved?” but aren’t sure where to start? Active learning is an approach that makes the traditional, passive approach to teaching more active and this session will explore how to harness good active teaching techniques in any educational scenario, whether you’re doing a 1-2-1 with a student or teaching a big group of people in one go. The session will be built around active learning principles so be prepared to get involved and get engaged in your own learning and teaching practices.

Please bring an internet-enabled device (phone, tablet, laptop etc.) to help with engaging in some of the activities.

Wed 12
Librarians in Training: Introduction to Rare Book Cataloguing new Finished 09:00 - 13:00 Queens' College, Munro Room

This course aims to provide instruction and practice in the creation of bibliographic records for rare books from the hand-press era so that attendees will be equipped with the basic skills to catalogue their library’s early printed books to national standards. Focus will primarily be on 17-18thcentury books printed in England and/or in English.

Basic knowledge and familiarity with MARC21 and AACR2 is essential.

Librarians in Training: How Usable is your Website? Usability and Accessibility Finished 14:00 - 15:30 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

Please note: Since this session was last offered, web accessibility has become increasingly important. The session has been revised to cover both usability testing and assessing the accessibility of websites.

This session will help you get started with website usability testing. The session will be interactive and activity-based, which will give you a chance to try out some testing and to reflect as a group on the experience. It will also provide you with some tips and tricks that can be used to help you conduct your own usability testing. If you’ve ever wondered how people actually use your library website, or are currently thinking about how to best revamp your Libguides to match the approaches and needs of your users, this one’s for you!

Thu 13
Librarians in Training: Metadata for Digital Objects new Finished 14:00 - 17:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This course will look at how to create metadata for online catalogues and digital libraries, concentrating on special collections material. We will be using TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) as the most suitable metadata standard for the description and presentation of manuscripts and rare books in a digital environment. The course will focus on the descriptive element of TEI, but will also touch on the possibilities for transcription, translation, and the presentation of digital images. There will be a taught element (1 hour) followed by the opportunity to have a go at creating a description in TEI yourself.

Mon 24
Librarians in Training: Bullet Journal 101: A Silver Bullet for Your Organising Woes? new POSTPONED 14:30 - 16:00 Cambridge University Library, Milstein Room

You’ve seen the gorgeous photos of hand-drawn planners on Instagram and thought, “I would never have time to make my diary look like that.” Or you’ve bought pre-made planners before only to abandon them after a week, but still prefer to have a paper-and-pen backup to your online calendars. Or maybe you’re just curious about what a bullet journal is. Whatever the case, Emma and Kirsten have you covered! With six years of bullet journal experience between them, they’ll talk you through the basics of bullet journaling, show you some of the ways you can customise yours and get you started on planning your life with paper and pen. Participants should bring their favourite pens as well as their appointments and to-do lists for the day of the session and the next day. If you have a notebook you were already going to use as a planner, feel free to bring it. Otherwise, scrap paper will be provided for practice.

July 2019

Tue 9
Librarians in Training: Cataloguing Odd Items new POSTPONED 10:00 - 12:00 St Catharine's College, Ramsden Room

In 1906, Melvil Dewey wrote that ‘what we call books have no exclusive rights in a library. The name “library” has lost its etymologic meaning and means not a collection of books, but the central agency for disseminating information, innocent recreation or, best of all, inspiration among the people.’ Most libraries contain mostly books. But most libraries have other things in them too. Some of these things – films, musical recordings, maps, sheet music – have standard cataloguing practices. But what about flashcards, skeletons, jigsaws, bookstands, postage stamps, DVD players, and the many other odds and ends we collate, curate and circulate. Should they be catalogued? Perhaps. Can they be catalogued? Certainly. This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of cataloguing ‘realia.’ Examples will be provided for group cataloguing activities, but feel free to bring along your own unusual library materials too.

Fri 12
Librarians in Training: Introduction to Indexing new Finished 09:30 - 11:30 Faculty of Law, B16

A two-hour session designed to introduce you to the skill of compiling back-of-the-book type indexes. Indexing is a useful skill for anyone working in a library or information environment and also provides opportunities for self-employment and working from home. We will touch on the basic processes, standards and conventions, the Society of Indexers’ course, and embedded indexing, and we will have a go at creating a basic index. Feel free to bring a laptop but they are not essential.

Tue 16
Librarians in Training: Building a Digital Library: Digital Collections and the IIIF Environment new Finished 14:30 - 16:00 Corpus Christi College, Parker Library

A growing number of images from cultural heritage institutions around the world are available for use and re-use by scholars through IIIF (the International Image Interoperability Framework http://iiif.io). This framework and community facilitate comparison of materials across repositories through a common protocol. It also allows for the use of a number of lightweight tools that can be hosted at your institution, or on your laptop, for viewing, annotation, transcription, and collection-building.

No previous experience with IIIF is required. The workshop will be led by Dr Anne McLaughlin, Sub-Librarian of The Parker Library, Corpus Christi College, and Andy Corrigan, Cambridge Digital Library Co-ordinator.

Please note: This course will be cancelled if booking numbers are insufficient.

September 2019

Wed 4
Librarians in Training: Helping Your Readers Get the Most Out of iDiscover new Finished 10:00 - 11:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

Led by members of the UL Reference team, this course will explore the varied reasons why readers struggle to find items they need on iDiscover. There will be a chance for you to solve some of the enquiries which are handled by Reference Staff, brush up your own searching skills and discover some lesser known functions of iDiscover.

The UL Reference team will be answering participant questions submitted prior to the course.

Information about the UL’s iDiscover training for readers will also be available.

Thu 26
Librarians in Training: ebooks@cambridge Training for Librarians Finished 14:30 - 16:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

Bewildered by business models? Dubious about DRM? Flummoxed by formats? Come to our ebooks training session where we will try and demystify all things ebook and help you to support your users.

We have re-vamped the content of this session this year, we are not concentrating so heavily on the basics, and will instead introduce some new information on aspects such as troubleshooting, file formats and accessibility.

The presentation part of the course will run for an hour and there is an optional 30 minutes where you are welcome to stay and work through the workbook of practise exercises. In the presentation we will introduce the ebooks@cambridge service, investigate the differences between purchase models, licenses and supplier platforms, and talk about Digital Rights Management (DRM) and ebook formats. We will also demonstrate ways of searching for ebooks in iDiscover and in Alma, how to use/download/print ebooks, and look at the differences between purchased and electronic legal deposit ebooks. We will discuss some common problems reported to the ebooks team, and touch on accessibility issues (including alternative format requests).

After the presentation attendees will be given a takeaway workbook of ebook-related exercises which will give them a chance to familiarise themselves with the breadth of our ebook collections. Librarians from the ebooks Advisory Group will be on hand to help answer any ebook-related questions you may have.

This session is aimed at newer members of library staff and those who would like a refresher on all things ebook.

October 2019

Thu 3
Librarians in Training: ebooks@cambridge Training for Librarians Finished 10:00 - 11:30 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

Bewildered by business models? Dubious about DRM? Flummoxed by formats? Come to our ebooks training session where we will try and demystify all things ebook and help you to support your users.

We have re-vamped the content of this session this year, we are not concentrating so heavily on the basics, and will instead introduce some new information on aspects such as troubleshooting, file formats and accessibility.

The presentation part of the course will run for an hour and there is an optional 30 minutes where you are welcome to stay and work through the workbook of practise exercises. In the presentation we will introduce the ebooks@cambridge service, investigate the differences between purchase models, licenses and supplier platforms, and talk about Digital Rights Management (DRM) and ebook formats. We will also demonstrate ways of searching for ebooks in iDiscover and in Alma, how to use/download/print ebooks, and look at the differences between purchased and electronic legal deposit ebooks. We will discuss some common problems reported to the ebooks team, and touch on accessibility issues (including alternative format requests).

After the presentation attendees will be given a takeaway workbook of ebook-related exercises which will give them a chance to familiarise themselves with the breadth of our ebook collections. Librarians from the ebooks Advisory Group will be on hand to help answer any ebook-related questions you may have.

This session is aimed at newer members of library staff and those who would like a refresher on all things ebook.

November 2019

Mon 25
Librarians in Training: Introduction to Rare Book Cataloguing Finished 09:00 - 13:00 Queens' College, Munro Room

This course aims to provide instruction and practice in the creation of bibliographic records for rare books from the hand-press era so that attendees will be equipped with the basic skills to catalogue their library’s early printed books to national standards. Focus will primarily be on 17th-18th Century books printed in England and/or in English.

Basic knowledge and familiarity with MARC21 and AACR2 is essential. Laptop optional (paper templates provided for exercises)

Thu 28
Librarians in Training: Library Assistants Forum new Finished 14:00 - 17:00 Faculty of English, GR06

A forum for Library Assistants and assistant staff across Cambridge University libraries with a series of talks and discussions around what the role means and how we can diversify and make the most of it in different library contexts.

December 2019

Mon 9
Librarians in Training: Academic Integrity Workshop new Finished 14:30 - 16:00 Student Services Centre, Exams Hall, Room AG03a

This is a workshop that Ruth Walker has run with Master’s students in Cambridge this year, and which has been recommended by a member of library staff attending it. By going to this workshop, staff will understand Academic Integrity and how it impacts students, and it will inform good practice for teaching opportunities.

January 2020

Wed 8
Librarians in Training: Introduction to Library of Congress Subject Headings new Finished 09:30 - 13:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

Do you see these subject headings in the catalogue records and wonder how they work? Do you add these subject headings yourself but sometimes wonder if you’re doing so correctly? Are you studying librarianship and would like to add some subject heading skills to your portfolio? This is an introduction to the workings of LC subject headings, an opportunity to ask all the questions you want, and get some practical experience of adding headings to catalogue records.

Mon 13
Librarians in Training: Copyright at the Enquiry Desk new Finished 14:30 - 16:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

If questions at the Enquiry Desk such as “How much of this can I copy?”, “Can I scan this book on someone else’s behalf?” and “Can I use this image in my teaching presentation / coursework / published article?” sound familiar, this is the course for you!

This session aims to provide you with a framework for analysing copyright enquiries, considering:

  • Who owns the item, and does this make a difference?
  • What is the copy to be used for?
  • What are the specific exceptions to copyright you should be aware of?
  • Where can you seek additional information on copyright issues?

There will be an opportunity to submit examples of copyright enquiries you receive in advance of the course or you can bring them along on the day.

Thu 16
Librarians in Training: Cataloguing Odd Items new Finished 10:00 - 12:00 St Catharine's College, Ramsden Room

In 1906, Melvil Dewey wrote that ‘what we call books have no exclusive rights in a library. The name “library” has lost its etymologic meaning and means not a collection of books, but the central agency for disseminating information, innocent recreation or, best of all, inspiration among the people.’

Most libraries contain mostly books. But most libraries have other things in them too. Some of these objects – films, musical recordings, maps, sheet music – have established cataloguing standards, developed through communities of practice. Others are more problematic. What should we do with our flashcards, skeletons, jigsaws, bookstands, postage stamps, DVD players, and the other odds-and-ends we collate, curate and circulate?

Should these things be catalogued? Perhaps. Can they be catalogued? Certainly. This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of cataloguing ‘realia.’ Examples will be provided for group cataloguing activities, but feel free to bring along your own unusual library materials too.

Wed 22
Librarians in Training: Getting to Know Scopus Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Department of Engineering, James Dyson Building, Teaching Room

Scopus is a citation and abstract database of peer-reviewed literature that can be used by researchers to determine the impact of specific authors, articles/documents, and journals. It contains over 76 million records in the areas of science, technology, medicine, social sciences, arts, and humanities. In Scopus, it is possible to perform quick searches by document, author, or affiliation. You will learn how to perform basic searches, analyse the results, check affiliation and researcher profiles and consult journal metrics for the over 23,000 titles currently in Scopus.

This session will be delivered by Dr Charles Martinez, Senior Customer Consultant, Elsevier.

Please bring your own device so you are able to follow along with the session examples.

There will be an opportunity to address user case studies in this session. Please send any case studies to Lynne Meehan (lm746@cam.ac.uk) by 17/1/2019.

Thu 23
Librarians in Training: Moodle - What It Can Do For Teaching new Finished 14:00 - 15:30 Department of Engineering, Library

Moodle is being used for all kinds of things at Cambridge, but do you know really what it can do?

From adding content to marking student papers, we will run through the activities and resources that can be used to support teaching in Moodle. The idea being to familiarise library staff with the possibilities and provide some areas of where we can support teaching staff on how to make Moodle work for their teaching practices.

Please come with questions and if there are any particular areas you would like to make sure we cover drop us an email (elj26@cam.ac.uk) as soon as you can and we will do our best to include it.

Fri 31
Librarians in Training: Introduction to LibGuides new Finished 11:00 - 12:00 Faculty of English, Library IT Training Suite

Making LibGuides which are usable, accessible and look great is not always an easy task, but it definitely can be done! This introductory training will cover everything from the basics – how to add text and images, edit and rearrange content – to presenting content in an effective, usable and attractive way. We’ll also discuss how you can ensure that your LibGuides meet accessibility standards.

This course is particularly aimed at people who are new to LibGuides editing or any current editors who feel that they would benefit from a refresher. If you don’t have a LibGuides account, or access to a LibGuide to work on during the session, please contact the course leader (hem37) in advance so that an account and a training guide can be arranged for you.

February 2020

Wed 26
Librarians in Training: Using Learning Outcomes to Plan Your Teaching Session new POSTPONED 10:30 - 12:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This session will explain what learning outcomes are and how you might design your teaching session according to different teaching styles e.g. Behaviourist or Constructivist. There will be an opportunity to practice planning a session and to link the content of the session to the Information Literacy Framework using the new CILN teaching template. There will be opportunities to discuss and work in small groups or pairs during the session.

Attendees should try to bring an idea for a session they have delivered, or would like to deliver, to use as an example for the session activities.

March 2020

Fri 20
Librarians in Training: Database Sharing (Cambridge Knowledge Exchange) new POSTPONED 10:30 - 12:00 Faculty of Divinity, Room 2

There are hundreds of databases available to us in Cambridge. How confident do you feel navigating them and recommending them to end users? For this session we have four faculty librarians who will demonstrate Scopus, ArtSTOR, Lexis and Westlaw and statistics and markets business databases. There will be plenty of time for questions.

Wed 25
Librarians in Training: ebook Purchasing Training for Librarians new POSTPONED 09:30 - 11:30 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This course is aimed at those faculty librarians who purchase their own ebooks and those who may be interested to start purchasing their own. The course will introduce librarians to our ebook suppliers, including ebook license models, how user-friendly they are and how to identify them on the supplier platforms. We will also look at Digital Rights Management (DRM) and ebooks; what are the implications for users, and why we should try to buy DRM-free ebooks where possible. We will demonstrate searching, interpreting results and purchasing ebooks from the main vendor platforms. We will also cover what happens after the ebook order, including creating purchase orders and invoices, cataloguing, and portfolio administration within Alma.

There will be chance to ask questions throughout the session, and an accompanying ebook supplier checklist to take away.

Librarians in Training: Introduction to Cataloguing in MARC21 new POSTPONED 14:00 - 17:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This course is an introduction to the core fields in MARC21, the format we use for catalogue records in Alma. It’s suitable for beginners and also for those who have done some cataloguing but want a more formal training session in MARC. We will look at MARC coding for author, title, publication information and physical description, and highlight the important elements to check in control fields.