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All Department of Chemistry courses

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Showing courses 51-75 of 84
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This session introduces new undergraduate Chemistry students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

Chemistry: Machine Learning in Chemistry 101 new Tue 14 Jan 2020   13:00 Finished

This graduate-level course gives an overview of machine learning (ML) techniques that are useful for solving problems in Chemistry, and particularly for the computational understanding and predictions of materials and molecules at the atomic level.

In the first part of the course, after taking a quick refresher of the basic concepts in probabilities and statistics, students will learn about basic and advanced ML methods including supervised learning and unsupervised learning.

During the second part, the connection between chemistry and mathematical tools of ML will be made and the concepts on the construction of loss functions, representations, descriptors and kernels will be introduced.

For the last part, experts who are actively using research methods to solve research problems in chemistry and materials will be invited to give real-world examples on how ML methods have transformed the way they perform research.

Chemistry: Philosophy for Physical Scientists Thu 6 May 2021   12:00 In progress

Science is a strikingly successful and powerful feature of contemporary human cultures: it has transformed lives, enabled great technological feats and often revealed the world to be a much stranger place than appearances suggest. But what is science, really, and how and why has it been so successful?

An 8 week Improv Theatre Course Improv teaches excellent skills for scientists! It will boost your confidence, teach you to be spontaneous and overcome the fear of failure. It will work wonders for your public speaking, communication and presentation skills.

Chemistry: Quantum Computing new Mon 10 Feb 2020   14:00 Finished

Lecture 1 - Fundamentals of Quantum Computing A short summary of all the basic quantum computing knowledge needed to do quantum chemistry on a quantum computer.

Lecture 2 - Encoding chemistry systems in quantum computers

  • Second quantization
  • Jordan-Wigner and Bravyi-Kitaev transforms
  • Molecular orbital encoding
  • State Preparation

Lecture 3 - Quantum algorithms for energy calculations

  • NISQ: Variational quantum algorithms
  • Future: Phase Estimation algorithms

Lecture 4 - Advanced quantum chemistry quantum computing algorithms

  • Excited Algorithms: QSE, Constrained Minimisation, etc
  • Special Ansatz using symmetry
  • Imaginary time evolution
  • TBA

To see a list of all upcoming Physical Chemistry Seminars please visit their webpage

You can also subscribe to these talks and download them to your calendar from the Talks webpage

To see a list of all upcoming Biological Chemistry Seminars please visit their webpage

You can also subscribe to these talks and download them to your calendar from the Talks webpage

To see a list of all upcoming Materials Chemistry Seminars please visit their webpage

You can also subscribe to these talks and download them to your calendar from the Talks webpage

To see a list of all upcoming Synthetic Chemistry Seminars please visit their webpage

You can also subscribe to these talks and download them to your calendar from the Talks webpage

Chemistry: SC1-10 Statistics for Chemists Mon 11 Jan 2021   10:00 Finished

This course is made up of 8 sessions which will be based around the topics below: unlike other courses in the Graduate Lecture Series, it is essential to attend all 8 sessions to benefit from this training. Places are limited so please be absolutely certain upon booking that you will commit to the entire course.

Once you book this course, you will need to register for each session via Zoom.

Chemistry: SF1 Departmental Safety Induction Thu 1 Oct 2020   00:00 Finished

The Departmental Advanced Safety Training covers basic induction training in how to work safely, including emergency arrangements for fire and evacuation, first aid and incidents including flood and gas leak. By attending, you are made aware of the Department’s Health and Safety Policy and your responsibilities under health and safety law. You will be introduced to the process required to prepare a risk assessment with standard operating procedure (SOP) or method statement, how to select the correct type of protective equipment (PPE) and why it needs to be worn, and reminded of the importance of good house keeping for reducing the likelihood of there being an incident. The hazards associated with display screen equipment (DSE) and manual handling are identified and the need to control them by a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risk is explained. Electrical safety and the requirement for annual Portable Appliance Testing (PAT) is made clear.

  • Please note you will find this training on Moodle.
Chemistry: SF2 University Chemical Safety Training Tue 6 Oct 2020   00:00 Finished

Part of Induction Week

Advanced induction training for experimentalists introduces some of the department’s special chemical hazards including explosives, hydrogen fluoride and cyanide, and restricted chemicals, and illustrates the consequences of incorrect waste disposal. Experimentalists are made aware of the biological hazards in the department and how these are controlled with a suitable risk assessment, safety cabinets and the need for the appropriate inactivation method to be applied. Attendees are alerted to the hazards and damage caused by non-ionising radiation, glassware and sharps, oil baths and lifting equipment. The induction concludes by directing the experimentalist to compulsory University-provided specialist training courses, the requirement for fire awareness training and sources of Health and Safety information.

  • This training is will be available on Moodle.
Chemistry: SF4 Pressurised Gas & Cryogens Tue 6 Oct 2020   00:00 Finished

This course will cover safe storage and use of cryogens, safe use and stores of compressed gas, and aspects of oxygen depletion with respect to the above.

  • This training will be available on Moodle.
Chemistry: SF5 Introduction to Demonstrating Wed 9 Oct 2019   11:00 Finished

We view demonstrating to undergraduate students as a key part of postgraduate education.

Demonstrating is compulsory for 1st and 2d year postgraduate students with the right background (we do not wish to place anybody in the undergraduate laboratories for whom this would be inappropriate).

Demonstrating is also open to all MPhil, 3rd/4th year graduate students and postdoctoral researchers.

Showcase Week presents the research of the Biological RIG. All second year students will submit a poster and all third year PhD students will present a 2 minute talk followed by a 2 minute Q&A.

PhD students will automatically be booked onto this event if they are a member of the RIG.

Showcase Week presents the research of the Materials RIG. All second year students will submit a poster and all third year PhD students will present a 2 minute talk followed by a 2 minute Q&A.

PhD students will automatically be booked onto this event if they are a member of the RIG.

Showcase Week presents the research of the Physical RIG. All second year students will submit a poster and all third year PhD students will present a 2 minute talk followed by a 2 minute Q&A.

PhD students will automatically be booked onto this event if they are a member of the RIG.

Chemistry: Showcase Week Practice Session new Wed 2 Sep 2020   10:30 Finished

An opportunity for third year Chemistry students making an oral presentation during Showcase Week 2020 to practise their presentation and receive feedback from peers and Dr Yolande Cordeaux, Knowledge Transfer Facilitator.

Please note an additional can be offered if the initial session is oversubscribed.

Showcase Week presents the research of the Synthesis RIG. All second year students will submit a poster and all third year PhD students will present a 2 minute talk followed by a 2 minute Q&A.

PhD students will automatically be booked onto this event if they are a member of the RIG.

Showcase Week presents the research of the Physical RIG. All second year students will submit a poster and all third year PhD students will present a 2 minute talk followed by a 2 minute Q&A.

PhD students will automatically be booked onto this event if they are a member of the RIG.

This course will focus on recent progress in the application of kernel-based methods, Random Forests and Deep Neural Networks to modelling in chemistry. The material will build on the content of the core Informatics course and introduce new descriptors, advanced modelling techniques and example applications drawn from the current literature. Lectures will be interactive, with students working through computational exercises during class sessions.

An applied introduction to probabilistic modelling, machine learning and artificial intelligence-based approaches for students with little or no background in theory and modelling. The course will be taught through a series of case studies from the current literature in which modelling approaches have been applied to large datasets from chemistry and biochemistry. Data and code will be made available to students and discussed in class. Students will become familiar with python based tools that implement the models though practical sessions and group based assignments.

This course will introduce students to the central question of how to encode molecules and molecular properties in a computational model. Building on the compulsory informatics course (see previous table entry), it will focus on reactivity parameterisation and prediction. The basics of DFT calculations will be introduced, together with how DFT can be used to model reactions (including flaws, assumptions, drawbacks etc). Lecture based format will be complemented by practical sessions in setting up different DFT-based calculations.

Chemistry: ST4 CDT Computational Parametrization new Thu 4 Feb 2021   14:00 Finished

This course will introduce students to the central question of how to encode molecules and molecular properties in a computational model. Building on the compulsory informatics course (see previous table entry), it will focus on reactivity parameterisation and prediction. The basics of DFT calculations will be introduced, together with how DFT can be used to model reactions (including flaws, assumptions, drawbacks etc). Lecture based format will be complemented by practical sessions in setting up different DFT-based calculations.

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