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Are you a post-doc applying for grants? Do you need to write a Data Management Plan as part of your grant application but don't know how? Are you a post-doc who is just interested in learning about writing data management plans? If so, this session is for you.

During this session you will learn everything you need to know about data management plans:

  • What they are
  • Why they are suddenly required as part of grant applications
  • What to include in data management plans
  • Tools to help writing data management plans

Refreshments will be provided (tea, coffee, and biscuits).

1 other event...

Date Availability
Wed 11 Apr 2018 10:00 [Places]

This workshop will introduce key concepts in sustainable materials design, including the evolution of materials, current material classes and consumption, life cycle analysis, and eco audits. Following the introduction to theory and several examples of applying eco audits to frequently debated problems, students will take apart modern electronic devices (tools provided). The workshop will close with a critical examination of the devices, material and design choices, as well as end-of-life options.

AO1 Molecular Orbitals in Organic Chemistry new Tue 4 Jul 2017   12:00 Finished

AO1 is a 3 part series, which runs over the course of three years in rotation and sees Molecular Orbitals in Organic Chemistry (the first part) being given this year. These lectures do not need to be taken in order. The series is as follows:

AO1 Part 1. Molecular Orbitals in Organic Chemistry (4L, current) These lectures introduce molecular orbitals – the fundamental description of electron distribution that chemists use to explain chemical bonding and chemical reactivity. There is no mathematics, only the basic physics. Topics include s-bonding, p-conjugation using the Hückel picture, hard and soft acids and bases, and reactivity using, with some circumspection, frontier orbital theory and the Salem-Klopman equation.

AO1 Part 2. Stereospecific Reactions in Organic Synthesis (4L, 2018) These lectures describe how the sense and degree of stereospecificity in several fundamental chemical reactions – substitution, elimination and addition – and the sense and degree of stereoselectivity in others – nucleophilic and electrophilic attack on double bonds with diastereotopic surfaces – can be explained by considering the molecular orbitals involved.

AO1 Part 3. Pericyclic Reactions (4L, 2019) These lectures continue the subject of stereospecificity, which is seen in its most powerful form in pericyclic reactions. The four classes of pericyclic reaction are described, and their allowedness and stereochemistry explained. The Woodward-Hoffmann rule is illustrated with the most telling examples.

AthenaSWAN Event new Thu 25 May 2017   12:30 Finished

Following our recent straw poll on how members of the Department would like to meet up and discuss issues relating to gender equality in our Department, this mixed gender meeting invites you to come and contribute to a discussion session over lunch.

The questions and issues to be discussed will be generated through people filling out this Anonymous Survey and all ideas/suggestions produced during the meeting will be taken to the AthenaSWAN Committee for discussion, potential approval and implementation.

BIO1 Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Medicinal Importance Wed 22 Feb 2017   13:00 Finished

Alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products produced primarily by plants but also by all other types of organism. They have a wide range of biological and medicinal properties, e.g. stimulants, toxins, hallucinogens, anti-cancer, anti-malaria, etc. In this lecture we will look at ways in which we can discover how an organism makes a particular natural product and then look at the biosynthetic pathways to one or two of the huge number of known alkaloids. Finally we will look at ways in which people have exploited existing biosynthetic pathways to make altered natural products or to transfer production to more amenable organisms.

BIO2 Terpenes: Biosynthesis and Medicinal Importance Fri 24 Feb 2017   13:00 Finished

Terpenes (isoprenoids) are the largest class of natural product. They all share a common biosynthetic pathway in which a linear hydrocarbon diphosphate undergoes cationic cyclisation followed by a seies of rearrangements, oxidations, cleavages etc. to generate the vast array of known structures. In this lecture we will look at the biosynthetic pathways to some of the more well-known terpenes, at engineering readily grown organisms to make medicinal terpenes or biofuels, and at organic synthetic reactions inspired by the terpene biosynthetic pathway.

BIO3 Multidomain Biosynthetic Enzymes: PKS & NRPS Mon 27 Feb 2017   13:00 Finished

Polyketides, made by polyketide synthases (PKS), and non-ribosomal peptides, made by non-ribosomal peptide synthases (NRPS) are futher large classes of natural products containing very important medicinal compounds, including antibiotics erthyromycin (PKS), penicillins and vancomycin (NRPS). Unlike the alkaloids and terpenes, which are made by a succession of steps catalysed by monofunctional enzymes, polyketides and non-ribosomal peptides are generally made by huge multifunctional proteins, to which the starting material is tethered at the start of the process and then extended and modified by a series of domains in the protein, before finally being released at the end of the chain. This lecture will look at the mechanisms involved and the organisation of these "molecular production lines".

Naturally produced polyketides and non-ribosomal peptides possess a broad range of important biological activities and have the potential to be developed into potent pharmacological drugs. The assembly of these natural products has been the subject of intensive protein engineering efforts to produce tailored and improved analogues that perform desired biological activities. In this lecture a researcher from Isomerase Therapeutics Ltd will discuss strategies to modify the production lines of modular biosynthetic systems introduced in the previous lecture, and will present the concepts used to create 'designer' natural products that act as pharmacological agents, using real-life examples from Isomerase's portfolio.

BIO5 Biocatalysis in Organic Synthesis Fri 3 Mar 2017   13:00 Finished

Enzymes, which essentially catalyse all the reactions that occur in nature, generally show exquisite enantioselectivity. This has made them very useful in synthetic processes where the target molecule is a single enantiomer (as is often the case for pharmaceuticals). In this lecture we will look at some of the advantages and issues involved in using enzymes in synthesis. Some enzymes carry out reactions with other types of selectivity that is hard to achieve synthetically, and elucidating biosynthetic pathways provides a vast resource of potential enzymes for synthesis. Some examples of this will be described.

Biological RIG Seminars Self-taught Not bookable

To see a list of all upcoming Biological Chemistry Seminars please visit http://www.ch.cam.ac.uk/talks/all-upcoming.

You can also subscribe to these talks and download them to your calendar from http://talks.cam.ac.uk.

The Masterclass is an intensive programme of talks from experts working in the broad areas of energy supply and demand, both in industry and the university. The focus is on technology challenges and opportunities, including examples of the use of science and engineering in the energy industry. The Masterclass covers a very broad range of themes, from conventional supplies, renewable supplies to energy efficiency, and it provides new insights about both long and short term challenges for the energy infrastructure. An important aspect of the Masterclass is the opportunity to learn about and debate some of the important questions concerning different energy sources, about energy efficiency and climate change. All undergraduates and graduate students may apply to attend the Masterclass, especially those in engineering, physical science or chemical engineering. To register please go to http://www.bpi.cam.ac.uk/masterclass2016

This session introduces new undergraduate Chemistry students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

Chemistry Networks Event Thu 29 Sep 2016   14:30 Finished

A special department networking with industry event. Places are very limited so please make sure that you attend if you book a place.

  • 2.30pm Overview of the Department - Prof. John Pyle | Head of Department
  • 2.50pm The Biological RIG - Dr.Finian Leeper | Chair of the Biological RIG
  • 3.10pm The Materials RIG - Prof. Oren Scherman | Director of the Melville Laboratory
  • 3.30pm Tea & Coffee (Todd-Hamied Room)
  • 4.00pm The Physical RIG - Prof. Rod Jones | Chair of the Physical RIG
  • 4.20pm The Synthesis RIG - Prof. Matthew Gaunt | Chair of the Synthesis RIG
  • 4.40pm The Theory RIG - Prof. David Wales | Chair of the Theory RIG
  • 5.00pm Reception and Poster session (Cybercafé)
CP11 The Energy Industry Wed 26 Oct 2016   16:00 Finished

A brief overview of the different divisions of the ‘downstream’ sector of an oil company and the ways in which chemistry can be applied. John Redshaw of BP will be giving this talk

CP1 Careers Options Tue 14 Mar 2017   11:00 Finished

PhDs in the physical science and technology disciplines have plenty of options once they graduate. In this interactive session we will look at the pros and cons of different career options. You will have a chance to think about what you want your work to do for you and what you can offer employers, and you will learn ways to find out more about jobs you are interested in.

Speaker Biography: Dr Madelaine Chapman graduated from the University of Edinburgh with a BSc in chemistry. She went on to complete a PhD at the same institution, focussing on the electrochemical and spectroscopic characterisation of a novel conducting polymer. She then joined the Royal Society of Chemistry, where she worked for five years in journal publishing before joining the University of Cambridge as a careers adviser, initially for research staff in the physical sciences and technology, and now also for students interested in a wide range of careers.

CP2 Applications and Selections Fri 17 Mar 2017   11:00 Finished

In this session you can learn more about how selection processes work including how to put together a CV and cover letter and how to prepare for job interviews.

CP3 Writing an Effective Fellowship Proposal Mon 13 Mar 2017   13:00 Finished

Professor Scherman will outline how to go about writing an effective fellowship proposal, in order that participants may have a realistic and practical idea of what this entails.

Speaker Biography: Oren Scherman graduated from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, with a BA in Chemistry in 1999. He was awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) graduate fellowship and moved to Pasadena, California, where he completed a PhD in 2004 in the area of olefin metathesis and controlled polymerisation, under the supervision of Professor Robert H. Grubbs at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). After finishing his PhD, Oren was awarded an NSF Mathematical and Physical Sciences Distinguished Research Fellow (MPS-DRF) International Postdoctoral Fellowship and moved to the Netherlands to work on supramolecular polymers with Professors E.W. Meijer and Rint P. Sijbesma at the Eindhoven University of Technology. In 2006, he moved to the University of Cambridge to take up an academic appointment as a University Lecturer and Next Generation Fellow in the Melville Laboratory for Polymer Synthesis in the Department of Chemistry. In 2012, he was promoted to Reader in Supramolecular and Polymer Chemistry and in March 2013, he was appointed as the Director of the Melville Laboratory and recently to Professor in 2015. During the 2013-2014 academic year, Oren was on sabbatical at Tsinghua University as the Xuetang Visiting Professor in Chemistry. His research group is interested in dynamic supramolecular self-assembly at interfaces. Oren’s current research projects include the application of macrocyclic host-guest chemistry using cucurbit[n]urils in the development of novel supramolecular hydrogels and microcapsules, drug-delivery systems based on dynamic hydrogels, the conservation and restoration of important historical artefacts through the exploitation of supramolecular polymer chemistry and sensing and catalysis using self-assembled nanophotonic systems.

CP4 Writing an Effective Grant Application Wed 15 Mar 2017   13:00 Finished

Professor Scherman will outline how to go about writing an effective grant application in order that participants may have a realistic idea of what this entails, should they be required to do so at any point.

Speaker Biography: Oren Scherman graduated from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, with a BA in Chemistry in 1999. He was awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) graduate fellowship and moved to Pasadena, California, where he completed a PhD in 2004 in the area of olefin metathesis and controlled polymerisation, under the supervision of Professor Robert H. Grubbs at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). After finishing his PhD, Oren was awarded an NSF Mathematical and Physical Sciences Distinguished Research Fellow (MPS-DRF) International Postdoctoral Fellowship and moved to the Netherlands to work on supramolecular polymers with Professors E.W. Meijer and Rint P. Sijbesma at the Eindhoven University of Technology. In 2006, he moved to the University of Cambridge to take up an academic appointment as a University Lecturer and Next Generation Fellow in the Melville Laboratory for Polymer Synthesis in the Department of Chemistry. In 2012, he was promoted to Reader in Supramolecular and Polymer Chemistry and in March 2013, he was appointed as the Director of the Melville Laboratory and recently to Professor in 2015. During the 2013-2014 academic year, Oren was on sabbatical at Tsinghua University as the Xuetang Visiting Professor in Chemistry. His research group is interested in dynamic supramolecular self-assembly at interfaces. Oren’s current research projects include the application of macrocyclic host-guest chemistry using cucurbit[n]urils in the development of novel supramolecular hydrogels and microcapsules, drug-delivery systems based on dynamic hydrogels, the conservation and restoration of important historical artefacts through the exploitation of supramolecular polymer chemistry and sensing and catalysis using self-assembled nanophotonic systems.

This session is compulsory for all experimentalists to attend and will provide useful information regarding analytical facilities at this Department including NMR, mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. Short descriptions will be given of all available instruments, together with a tour to show participants where these instruments are located, as well as explain the procedures for preparing/submitting samples for the analysis will also be discussed.

CT2 Fundamentals of Mass Spectrometry Wed 12 Oct 2016   13:00 Finished

Mass spectrometry is one of the main analytical-chemical techniques used to characterise organic compounds and their elemental composition. This overview will discuss some of the most frequently used mass spectrometry techniques and their specific strengths (e.g., quadrupole, time-of-flight and high-resolution MS), as well as ionisation techniques such as electron ionisation (EI), electrospray ionisation (ESI), matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) and MS techniques to quantify metal concentrations (e.g. inductively coupled plasma MS, ICP-MS) and isotope ratios.

During the last decade, mass spectrometry (MS) has become an indispensable tool in experimental biophysics, capable of providing unique information on the conformation and dynamics of biomolecules, as well as their interactions with physiological partners. In this short course, the current state of biophysical MS will be presented, with emphasis on experimental techniques that are used to study protein higher order structure and dynamics. Biophysical methods that use MS are native MS, tandem MS (MS/MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS (HDX-MS), chemical cross-linking MS (CXL-MS) and ion mobility MS (IM-MS).

CT4 Solution Phase NMR Spectroscopy Mon 24 Oct 2016   13:00 Finished

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy represents one of the most informative and widely used techniques for characterisation of compounds in the solution and solid state. Most researchers barely tap into the potential of the experiments that are available on the instruments in the Department, so in this short course we will explore the basic concepts that will allow you to make the most of these powerful techniques for routine analysis, as well as introducing more specialised experiments.

CT5 An Introduction to NMR Processing with TopSpin new Mon 31 Oct 2016   12:30 Finished

The aim of the session is:

  • to provide you with basic abilities to use TopSpin
  • Extract information from the NMR data, giving you knowledge about the sample.
  • Produce spectra to include in reports.

The session will also give an insight into some of the more advanced features of the software, and how to optimise your workflow.

CT6 Solid State NMR Spectroscopy Wed 9 Nov 2016   13:00 Finished

The aim of this course is to provide an idea of what kind of scientific problems can be solved by solid state NMR. It will cover how NMR can be used to study molecular structure, nanostructure and dynamics in the solid state, including heterogeneous solids, such as polymers, MOFs, energy-storage and biological materials. No previous knowledge of solid state NMR will be required, just a basic working knowledge of solution-state NMR for 1H and 13C, i.e. undergraduate level NMR. In order to highlight the utility of this technique, some materials based research using solid state NMR will also be covered.

CT7 X-Ray Crystallography Thu 17 Nov 2016   13:00 Finished

These lectures will introduce the basics of crystallography and diffraction, assuming no prior knowledge. The aim is to provide an overview that will inspire and serve as a basis for researchers to use the Department’s single-crystal and/or powder X-ray diffraction facilities or to appreciate more effectively results obtained through the Department’s crystallographic services. The final lecture will be devoted to searching and visualising crystallographic data using the Cambridge Structural Database system.

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