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Cambridge Digital Humanities

Cambridge Digital Humanities course timetable

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Sat 18 Jan – Mon 15 Jun

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January 2020

Tue 21
Qualitative Research in Online Environments new Finished 11:30 - 13:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

What happens to the practice of qualitative research when interactions between researcher and research subject are largely mediated. This session will explore a wide range of topics including the challenge of consent, researcher presence and ‘lurking’ in mediated settings, how to engage with digital gatekeepers, information security for researchers, and understanding the impact of digital platform architecture on qualitative research design.

Mon 27
Network Analysis for Humanities Scholars new Finished 12:30 - 14:30 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This workshop is a very basic introduction to network analysis for humanities scholars. It will introduce the concepts of networks, nodes, edges, directed and weighted networks, bi- and multi-partite networks. It will give an overview of the kinds of things that can be thought about through a network framework, as well as some things that can’t. And it will introduce key theories, including weak ties, and small worlds. There will be an activity where participants will build their own test data set that they can then visualise. In the second half of the workshop we will cover some networks metrics including various centrality measures, clustering coefficient, community detection algorithms. It will include an activity introducing one basic web-based tool that allows you to run some of these algorithms and will provide suggestions for routes forward with other tools and coding libraries that allows quantitative analysis.

Attendees should bring their own laptops.

Ruth Ahnert is Professor of Literary History & Digital Humanities at Queen Mary University of London, and is currently leading two large AHRC-funded projects: Living with Machines, and Networking Archives. She is author of The Rise of Prison Literature in the Sixteenth Century (2013), and co-author of Tudor Networks of Power, and The Network Turn (both forthcoming).

Tue 28
Data Presentation and Preservation new Finished 11:30 - 13:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

The afterlife of your research data forms a vitally important part of your research project. Research funders and academic journal publishers are often strongly committed to the re-use of data and are reluctant to fund or publish research where datasets are not accessible for the purposes of peer review or further use. Yet the push for open data exists in tension with the expectations of data protection law which requires transparency from researchers about how long they will retain personal data. This session will explore good practice in data sharing and archiving as well as introducing sources of further information and advice within the University on this topic.

February 2020

Tue 4
Social Network Analysis with Digital Data new (1 of 4) Finished 11:00 - 13:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This course will provide a hands-on introduction to the field of Social Network Analysis, giving participants the opportunity to “learn by doing” the process of network data collection and analysis. After being introduced to the basic concepts, the participants will have the opportunity to explore all stages of a social network analysis project, including research design, essential measures, data collection and data analysis. The focus will be on the retrieval of electronic archival data (e.g. websites, digital archives and social media platforms) for non-programmers and on the production of network analysis with specialised software (e.g. Gephi). At the end, the participants will be equipped with the basic tools to perform meaningful visualisations and analyses of network data.

Tue 11
Social Network Analysis with Digital Data new (2 of 4) Finished 11:00 - 13:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This course will provide a hands-on introduction to the field of Social Network Analysis, giving participants the opportunity to “learn by doing” the process of network data collection and analysis. After being introduced to the basic concepts, the participants will have the opportunity to explore all stages of a social network analysis project, including research design, essential measures, data collection and data analysis. The focus will be on the retrieval of electronic archival data (e.g. websites, digital archives and social media platforms) for non-programmers and on the production of network analysis with specialised software (e.g. Gephi). At the end, the participants will be equipped with the basic tools to perform meaningful visualisations and analyses of network data.

Wed 12
Online Platform for Historical Texts and Natural Language Processing - Focus Group new Finished 10:00 - 14:00 Cambridge University Library, Aoi Comms Room 1

We are running a focus group to try out Gale Digital Scholar Lab, an online platform of Digital Humanities tools for organising and analysing the historical texts in their archive. Gale representatives will demo the capabilities of the Lab and give you a practical opportunity to build your own corpus and do some analysis and visualisation (without writing a line of code). You will have a chance to feedback your opinions and research needs, and discuss broader issues of how these sorts of tools might fit in with your Digital Humanities research, and the role of private sector providers in the provision of tools and resources to researchers.

Gale Digital Scholar Lab will be available to participants in advance of the focus group. A link will be sent to participants by email. Refreshments and light lunch will be provided. Please bring your own laptop.

Mon 17
Beginner's Filmmaking Workshop new (1 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Tutors: Sarah McEvoy / Kostas Chondros

Are you curious about making a short documentary film?

This beginner’s filmmaking workshop will help you to start thinking visually and communicate using sound and film. Over two days you will be introduced to different camera shot types, how to construct a basic story, use digital video cameras and sound recorders to shoot your own footage, and then edit a short sequence for export.

The workshop assumes no or very little prior knowledge of filmmaking and no prior preparation is required for the workshop. This is a hands-on practical workshop, working in small teams of two or three people. We expect a willingness to be open to ideas and work in a team to jointly create a short film clip.

The workshop will give you the foundational skills to incorporate film and sound in your own future projects, for example short clips for social media, publicity about research projects as a way to engage wider audiences etc.

During the workshop you will work with dedicated video equipment, but the techniques you will learn can be adapted to film making with smartphones, tablets and other readily available personal electronic devices.

COURSE PROGRAMME

Day 1 – Monday 17th February

  • 10.00 Welcome and introductions
  • 10.30 Aims of the session
  • 10.45 Introduction to shot types, camera movements, framing, telling a story, basic rules of camera use, rules of recording sound
  • 11.45 Splitting into groups – interactive demonstration of how to use the cameras
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Filming around Cambridge, practical exercise working in groups
  • 16.00 Return to room to look at footage from all groups
  • 17.00 Feedback session and summary of day 1 intro to day 2

Day 2 – Tuesday 18th February

We will be working on apple macs and Final Cut X; however we do not expect any prior knowledge of working with either computer or software

  • 10.00 Importing footage onto computers
  • 10.15 Basic editing, creating a 2-minute clip, summary of creating a sequence
  • 10.45 Adding clips to timeline, tools for manipulating clips, using second video track, transitions and filters, syncing audio
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Credits, titles, adjusting audio levels, adding music or narration, exporting footage, saving files
  • 16.00 Looking at each other’s edited clips
  • 16.45 Evaluation
  • 17.00 Finish

Handouts will be emailed after the workshop, and include:

Presentation – shot types, how to construct a sequence Editing on Final Cut x Camera functions, audio recording, info about equipment and editing software and model release forms

What you need to take with you

Headphones – preferably the kind you can plug in rather than Bluetooth headphones

Storage device – if you want to take footage you shoot with you after the workshop, you will need a hard drive, USB or SD card that can hold at least 8GB. Video files are large. Please make sure that the device is formatted to FAT32 if you use it on a PC, as we will be using macs. You can check this by right clicking the device and checking the properties. If you prefer, you don’t need to save the footage that you film and can also upload the exported film to Dropbox.

Upon booking this workshop a questionnaire will be issued to participants which must be completed in order to satisfy the booking.

The workshop is led by:

Sarah McEvoy holds BA Hons Fine Art and an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths University of London and has most recently completed an MA in Art and Design in Education at UCL Institute of Education. Sarah has worked with arts organisations and charities creating short documentaries and has most recently filmed and edited a film working with a socially engaged artist in the community of South East London. As an artist-educator, Sarah works with youth groups and adults with learning disabilities in the community and museums and galleries.

Kostas Chondros holds an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths College, University of London. He also holds an MA in Social Exclusion, Minorities & Gender from Panteion University and a BA in Social Anthropology & History from the University of the Aegean, Greece. Since joining the Personal Histories film production team in 2011, Kostas has filmed several events and taught camera & film production skills. Additionally, as a freelance filmmaker, Kostas documents improvised music performances and collaborates on film projects with other artists and performers. He is also a musician, poet and translator.

Beginner's Filmmaking Workshop new (2 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Tutors: Sarah McEvoy / Kostas Chondros

Are you curious about making a short documentary film?

This beginner’s filmmaking workshop will help you to start thinking visually and communicate using sound and film. Over two days you will be introduced to different camera shot types, how to construct a basic story, use digital video cameras and sound recorders to shoot your own footage, and then edit a short sequence for export.

The workshop assumes no or very little prior knowledge of filmmaking and no prior preparation is required for the workshop. This is a hands-on practical workshop, working in small teams of two or three people. We expect a willingness to be open to ideas and work in a team to jointly create a short film clip.

The workshop will give you the foundational skills to incorporate film and sound in your own future projects, for example short clips for social media, publicity about research projects as a way to engage wider audiences etc.

During the workshop you will work with dedicated video equipment, but the techniques you will learn can be adapted to film making with smartphones, tablets and other readily available personal electronic devices.

COURSE PROGRAMME

Day 1 – Monday 17th February

  • 10.00 Welcome and introductions
  • 10.30 Aims of the session
  • 10.45 Introduction to shot types, camera movements, framing, telling a story, basic rules of camera use, rules of recording sound
  • 11.45 Splitting into groups – interactive demonstration of how to use the cameras
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Filming around Cambridge, practical exercise working in groups
  • 16.00 Return to room to look at footage from all groups
  • 17.00 Feedback session and summary of day 1 intro to day 2

Day 2 – Tuesday 18th February

We will be working on apple macs and Final Cut X; however we do not expect any prior knowledge of working with either computer or software

  • 10.00 Importing footage onto computers
  • 10.15 Basic editing, creating a 2-minute clip, summary of creating a sequence
  • 10.45 Adding clips to timeline, tools for manipulating clips, using second video track, transitions and filters, syncing audio
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Credits, titles, adjusting audio levels, adding music or narration, exporting footage, saving files
  • 16.00 Looking at each other’s edited clips
  • 16.45 Evaluation
  • 17.00 Finish

Handouts will be emailed after the workshop, and include:

Presentation – shot types, how to construct a sequence Editing on Final Cut x Camera functions, audio recording, info about equipment and editing software and model release forms

What you need to take with you

Headphones – preferably the kind you can plug in rather than Bluetooth headphones

Storage device – if you want to take footage you shoot with you after the workshop, you will need a hard drive, USB or SD card that can hold at least 8GB. Video files are large. Please make sure that the device is formatted to FAT32 if you use it on a PC, as we will be using macs. You can check this by right clicking the device and checking the properties. If you prefer, you don’t need to save the footage that you film and can also upload the exported film to Dropbox.

Upon booking this workshop a questionnaire will be issued to participants which must be completed in order to satisfy the booking.

The workshop is led by:

Sarah McEvoy holds BA Hons Fine Art and an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths University of London and has most recently completed an MA in Art and Design in Education at UCL Institute of Education. Sarah has worked with arts organisations and charities creating short documentaries and has most recently filmed and edited a film working with a socially engaged artist in the community of South East London. As an artist-educator, Sarah works with youth groups and adults with learning disabilities in the community and museums and galleries.

Kostas Chondros holds an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths College, University of London. He also holds an MA in Social Exclusion, Minorities & Gender from Panteion University and a BA in Social Anthropology & History from the University of the Aegean, Greece. Since joining the Personal Histories film production team in 2011, Kostas has filmed several events and taught camera & film production skills. Additionally, as a freelance filmmaker, Kostas documents improvised music performances and collaborates on film projects with other artists and performers. He is also a musician, poet and translator.

Tue 18
Beginner's Filmmaking Workshop new (3 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Tutors: Sarah McEvoy / Kostas Chondros

Are you curious about making a short documentary film?

This beginner’s filmmaking workshop will help you to start thinking visually and communicate using sound and film. Over two days you will be introduced to different camera shot types, how to construct a basic story, use digital video cameras and sound recorders to shoot your own footage, and then edit a short sequence for export.

The workshop assumes no or very little prior knowledge of filmmaking and no prior preparation is required for the workshop. This is a hands-on practical workshop, working in small teams of two or three people. We expect a willingness to be open to ideas and work in a team to jointly create a short film clip.

The workshop will give you the foundational skills to incorporate film and sound in your own future projects, for example short clips for social media, publicity about research projects as a way to engage wider audiences etc.

During the workshop you will work with dedicated video equipment, but the techniques you will learn can be adapted to film making with smartphones, tablets and other readily available personal electronic devices.

COURSE PROGRAMME

Day 1 – Monday 17th February

  • 10.00 Welcome and introductions
  • 10.30 Aims of the session
  • 10.45 Introduction to shot types, camera movements, framing, telling a story, basic rules of camera use, rules of recording sound
  • 11.45 Splitting into groups – interactive demonstration of how to use the cameras
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Filming around Cambridge, practical exercise working in groups
  • 16.00 Return to room to look at footage from all groups
  • 17.00 Feedback session and summary of day 1 intro to day 2

Day 2 – Tuesday 18th February

We will be working on apple macs and Final Cut X; however we do not expect any prior knowledge of working with either computer or software

  • 10.00 Importing footage onto computers
  • 10.15 Basic editing, creating a 2-minute clip, summary of creating a sequence
  • 10.45 Adding clips to timeline, tools for manipulating clips, using second video track, transitions and filters, syncing audio
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Credits, titles, adjusting audio levels, adding music or narration, exporting footage, saving files
  • 16.00 Looking at each other’s edited clips
  • 16.45 Evaluation
  • 17.00 Finish

Handouts will be emailed after the workshop, and include:

Presentation – shot types, how to construct a sequence Editing on Final Cut x Camera functions, audio recording, info about equipment and editing software and model release forms

What you need to take with you

Headphones – preferably the kind you can plug in rather than Bluetooth headphones

Storage device – if you want to take footage you shoot with you after the workshop, you will need a hard drive, USB or SD card that can hold at least 8GB. Video files are large. Please make sure that the device is formatted to FAT32 if you use it on a PC, as we will be using macs. You can check this by right clicking the device and checking the properties. If you prefer, you don’t need to save the footage that you film and can also upload the exported film to Dropbox.

Upon booking this workshop a questionnaire will be issued to participants which must be completed in order to satisfy the booking.

The workshop is led by:

Sarah McEvoy holds BA Hons Fine Art and an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths University of London and has most recently completed an MA in Art and Design in Education at UCL Institute of Education. Sarah has worked with arts organisations and charities creating short documentaries and has most recently filmed and edited a film working with a socially engaged artist in the community of South East London. As an artist-educator, Sarah works with youth groups and adults with learning disabilities in the community and museums and galleries.

Kostas Chondros holds an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths College, University of London. He also holds an MA in Social Exclusion, Minorities & Gender from Panteion University and a BA in Social Anthropology & History from the University of the Aegean, Greece. Since joining the Personal Histories film production team in 2011, Kostas has filmed several events and taught camera & film production skills. Additionally, as a freelance filmmaker, Kostas documents improvised music performances and collaborates on film projects with other artists and performers. He is also a musician, poet and translator.

Social Network Analysis with Digital Data new (3 of 4) Finished 11:00 - 13:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This course will provide a hands-on introduction to the field of Social Network Analysis, giving participants the opportunity to “learn by doing” the process of network data collection and analysis. After being introduced to the basic concepts, the participants will have the opportunity to explore all stages of a social network analysis project, including research design, essential measures, data collection and data analysis. The focus will be on the retrieval of electronic archival data (e.g. websites, digital archives and social media platforms) for non-programmers and on the production of network analysis with specialised software (e.g. Gephi). At the end, the participants will be equipped with the basic tools to perform meaningful visualisations and analyses of network data.

Beginner's Filmmaking Workshop new (4 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Tutors: Sarah McEvoy / Kostas Chondros

Are you curious about making a short documentary film?

This beginner’s filmmaking workshop will help you to start thinking visually and communicate using sound and film. Over two days you will be introduced to different camera shot types, how to construct a basic story, use digital video cameras and sound recorders to shoot your own footage, and then edit a short sequence for export.

The workshop assumes no or very little prior knowledge of filmmaking and no prior preparation is required for the workshop. This is a hands-on practical workshop, working in small teams of two or three people. We expect a willingness to be open to ideas and work in a team to jointly create a short film clip.

The workshop will give you the foundational skills to incorporate film and sound in your own future projects, for example short clips for social media, publicity about research projects as a way to engage wider audiences etc.

During the workshop you will work with dedicated video equipment, but the techniques you will learn can be adapted to film making with smartphones, tablets and other readily available personal electronic devices.

COURSE PROGRAMME

Day 1 – Monday 17th February

  • 10.00 Welcome and introductions
  • 10.30 Aims of the session
  • 10.45 Introduction to shot types, camera movements, framing, telling a story, basic rules of camera use, rules of recording sound
  • 11.45 Splitting into groups – interactive demonstration of how to use the cameras
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Filming around Cambridge, practical exercise working in groups
  • 16.00 Return to room to look at footage from all groups
  • 17.00 Feedback session and summary of day 1 intro to day 2

Day 2 – Tuesday 18th February

We will be working on apple macs and Final Cut X; however we do not expect any prior knowledge of working with either computer or software

  • 10.00 Importing footage onto computers
  • 10.15 Basic editing, creating a 2-minute clip, summary of creating a sequence
  • 10.45 Adding clips to timeline, tools for manipulating clips, using second video track, transitions and filters, syncing audio
  • 13.00 Lunch
  • 14.00 Credits, titles, adjusting audio levels, adding music or narration, exporting footage, saving files
  • 16.00 Looking at each other’s edited clips
  • 16.45 Evaluation
  • 17.00 Finish

Handouts will be emailed after the workshop, and include:

Presentation – shot types, how to construct a sequence Editing on Final Cut x Camera functions, audio recording, info about equipment and editing software and model release forms

What you need to take with you

Headphones – preferably the kind you can plug in rather than Bluetooth headphones

Storage device – if you want to take footage you shoot with you after the workshop, you will need a hard drive, USB or SD card that can hold at least 8GB. Video files are large. Please make sure that the device is formatted to FAT32 if you use it on a PC, as we will be using macs. You can check this by right clicking the device and checking the properties. If you prefer, you don’t need to save the footage that you film and can also upload the exported film to Dropbox.

Upon booking this workshop a questionnaire will be issued to participants which must be completed in order to satisfy the booking.

The workshop is led by:

Sarah McEvoy holds BA Hons Fine Art and an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths University of London and has most recently completed an MA in Art and Design in Education at UCL Institute of Education. Sarah has worked with arts organisations and charities creating short documentaries and has most recently filmed and edited a film working with a socially engaged artist in the community of South East London. As an artist-educator, Sarah works with youth groups and adults with learning disabilities in the community and museums and galleries.

Kostas Chondros holds an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths College, University of London. He also holds an MA in Social Exclusion, Minorities & Gender from Panteion University and a BA in Social Anthropology & History from the University of the Aegean, Greece. Since joining the Personal Histories film production team in 2011, Kostas has filmed several events and taught camera & film production skills. Additionally, as a freelance filmmaker, Kostas documents improvised music performances and collaborates on film projects with other artists and performers. He is also a musician, poet and translator.

Tue 25
Social Network Analysis with Digital Data new (4 of 4) Finished 11:00 - 13:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This course will provide a hands-on introduction to the field of Social Network Analysis, giving participants the opportunity to “learn by doing” the process of network data collection and analysis. After being introduced to the basic concepts, the participants will have the opportunity to explore all stages of a social network analysis project, including research design, essential measures, data collection and data analysis. The focus will be on the retrieval of electronic archival data (e.g. websites, digital archives and social media platforms) for non-programmers and on the production of network analysis with specialised software (e.g. Gephi). At the end, the participants will be equipped with the basic tools to perform meaningful visualisations and analyses of network data.

April 2020

Thu 30
Introduction to Text-mining with Python new [Places] 10:00 - 12:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This session will introduce basic methods for reading and processing text files in Python with Jupyter Notebooks. We will walk through an example that reads in a text corpus, splits it into words and sentences (tokens), removes unwanted words (stopwords), counts the tokens (frequency analysis), and visualises results. We will talk about the 5 steps of text-mining and what resources to use when learning text mining for your research in your own time.

Pre-requisites: No prior knowledge of Python is required, and no installations will be needed. We will use web services available in your browser to follow along.

Required preparation: A short internet-based exercise in working with variables and text in Python.

May 2020

Thu 7
Mapping the Past new (1 of 2) [Places] 11:00 - 12:30 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This intensive workshop is split into two 1.5hr sessions. Participants will learn to collect and process geospatial data from historical sources and process it using geographical information systems from Google Maps to Arc-GIS.

The first introduces research techniques for collecting, arranging and analysing geospatial data from historical sources, and is taught by Oliver Dunn. This session will be held 11:00–12:30 in the IT Training Room, Cambridge University.

The second introduces historical geographical information system Arc-GIS (provided). Student are taken through the map creation process step-by-step. This is taught by Max Satchell. This session will be held 13:30–15:00 in the Top Lab in Geography, Downing Site.

No equipment is necessary.

Mapping the Past new (2 of 2) [Places] 13:30 - 15:00 Department of Geography, Downing Site - Top Lab

This intensive workshop is split into two 1.5hr sessions. Participants will learn to collect and process geospatial data from historical sources and process it using geographical information systems from Google Maps to Arc-GIS.

The first introduces research techniques for collecting, arranging and analysing geospatial data from historical sources, and is taught by Oliver Dunn. This session will be held 11:00–12:30 in the IT Training Room, Cambridge University.

The second introduces historical geographical information system Arc-GIS (provided). Student are taken through the map creation process step-by-step. This is taught by Max Satchell. This session will be held 13:30–15:00 in the Top Lab in Geography, Downing Site.

No equipment is necessary.

Wed 20
Evolve your Python Code into a Workflow for Text-based Research new [Places] 13:00 - 16:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This workshop will develop your coding practice from testing ideas to creating an efficient workflow for your code, data and analysis. If you are using Jupyter Notebooks (but even if you’re not) this workshop will demonstrate how to better manage your code using good programming practices, and package your code into a program that is easier and quicker to run for lots of data and more reliable.

Required preparation (instructions provided): Python 3 installed on laptop; a text editor or IDE installed on laptop; git installed on laptop and signed up for GitHub; a short internet-based exercise in working with the command line.

June 2020

Wed 3
Sources to Data new [Places] 11:00 - 12:30 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

Archives typically hold records containing enormous quantities of data presented in a variety of scribal and print formats. Extracting this information has traditionally involved long hours of expensive manual data-entry work. Nowadays this work can be automated to a large degree and could soon open archives and allow for unprecedentedly large structured data sets for curators, researchers, and the public alike. This workshop will examine new methods for collecting historical data from manuscript and printed documents. We will look at archival photography, OCR, page structure recognition, and new handwritten text recognition systems. Cutting-edge Cambridge research in this field will be demonstrated.

Wed 10
Introduction to Archival Photography workshop new [Places] 11:00 - 12:30 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

This session focusses on providing photography skills for those undertaking archival research. Dr Oliver Dunn has experience spanning more than 10 years digitising written and printed historical sources for major university research projects in the humanities and social sciences. The focus is very much on low-tech approaches and small budgets. We’ll consider best uses of smartphones, digital cameras and tripods.

Mon 15
Machine Reading the Archive 2020 - end of programme workshop new [Places] 11:30 - 15:30 Institute of Criminology - B3

This public workshop will mark the end of the 2020 programme of Machine Reading the Archive, a digital methods development programme organised by Cambridge Digital Humanities with the support of the Researcher Development Fund.

It will showcase the digital archive projects created by our cohort of project participants as well as invited contributions from leading experts in the field.