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The goal of metabolomics is to identify and quantify the complete biochemical composition of a biological sample. With the increase in genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic information there is a growing need to understand the metabolic phenotype that these genes and proteins ultimately control.

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of metabolomics and its applications in life sciences, clinical and environmental settings. Over 2 days we will introduce different techniques used to extract metabolites and analyse samples to collect metabolomic data (such as HPLC or GC-based MS and NMR), present how to analyse such data, how to identify metabolites using online databases and how to map the metabolomic data to metabolic pathways.

The course content will predominantly be based on analysing samples from model plant species such as Arabidopsis thaliana but the procedures are transferable to all other organisms, including clinical and environmental settings.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Analysis of DNA Methylation using Sequencing Wed 20 Nov 2019   09:30 Finished

This course will cover all aspects of the analysis of DNA methylation using sequencing, including primary analysis, mapping and quality control of BS-Seq data, common pitfalls and complications.

It will also include exploratory analysis of methylation, looking at different methods of quantitation, and a variety of ways of looking more widely at the distribution of methylation over the genome. Finally the course will look at statistical methods to predict differential methylation.

The course will be comprised of a mixture of theoretical lectures and practicals covering a range of different software packages.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

This advanced course will cover high-throughput sequencing data processing, ChIP-seq data analysis (including alignment, peak calling), differences in analyses methods for transcription factors (TF) binding and epigenomic datasets, a range of downstream analysis methods for extracting meaningful biology from ChIP-seq data and will provide an introduction to the analysis of open chromatin with ATAC-seq and long-distance interactions with chromosomal conformation capture based Hi-C datasets.

Materials for this course can be found here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

This course provides an introduction to the tools available through the Bioconductor project for manipulating and analysing high-throughput sequencing (HTS) data. We will present workflows for the analysis of ChIP-Seq and RNA-seq data starting from aligned reads in bam format. We will also describe the various resources available through Bioconductor to annotate and visualize HTS data, which can be applied to any type of sequencing experiment.

The course timetable is available here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Analysis of mapped NGS data with SeqMonk Wed 3 Feb 2016   09:30 Finished

SeqMonk is a graphical program for the visualisation and analysis of large mapped sequencing datasets such as ChIP-Seq, RNA-Seq, and BS-Seq.

The program allows you to view your reads against an annotated genome and to quantitate and filter your data to let you identify regions of interest. It is a friendly way to explore and analysis very large datasets.

This course provides an introduction to the main features of SeqMonk and will run through the analysis of a couple of different datasets to show what sort of analysis options it provides.

Further information is available here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Analysis of single cell RNA-seq data Mon 16 Dec 2019   09:30 Finished

Recent technological advances have made it possible to obtain genome-wide transcriptome data from single cells using high-throughput sequencing (scRNA-seq). Even though scRNA-seq makes it possible to address problems that are intractable with bulk RNA-seq data, analysing scRNA-seq is also more challenging.

In this course we will be surveying the existing problems as well as the available computational and statistical frameworks available for the analysis of scRNA-seq.

The course website providing links to the course materials can be found here.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

In this course we will introduce web-based, open source tools to analyse and interpret high-throughput biological data.

The main focus will be g:Profiler - a toolset for finding most significant functional groups for a given gene or protein list; MEM - a query engine allowing to mine hundreds of public gene expression datasets to find most co-expressed genes based on a query gene; and ClustVis - a web tool for visualizing clustering of multivariate data using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) plot and heatmap.

MEM and g:Profiler are ELIXIR-Estonia node services.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Bioinformatics for Principal Investigators Mon 16 Sep 2019   09:30 Finished

The aim of this workshop is to provide principal investigators with an introduction to the challenges of working with biological data and to the best practices, and tools, needed to perform bioinformatics research effectively and reproducibly.

On day 1, we will cover the importance of experimental design, discuss the challenges associated with (i) the analysis of high-throughput sequencing data (utilising RNA-seq as a working example) and (ii) the application of machine learning algorithms, as well as issues relating to reusability and reproducibility.

On day 2, we will put into practice concepts from day 1, running a RNA-seq data analysis pipeline, going from raw reads through differential expression analysis and the interpretation of downstream analysis results. Challenges encountered at each step of the analytical pipeline will be discussed. Please note that day 2 is optional.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

The Open Microscopy Environment (OME) is an open-source software project that develops tools that enable access, analysis, visualization, sharing and publication of biological image data.

OME has three components:

  • OME-TIFF, standardised file format and data model;
  • Bio-Formats, a software library for reading proprietary image file formats; and
  • OMERO, a software platform for image data management and analysis.

In this one day course, we will present the OMERO platform, and show how Facility Managers can use it to manage users, groups, and their microscopy, HCS and digital pathology data.

Help pages on 'Using OMERO for Facility Managers' can be found here.

This course is organized alongside a one day course on Biological Imaging Data Management for Life Scientists. More information on this event are available here.

This course will be delivered by members of the OMERO team. The OME project is supported by BBSRC and Wellcome Trust.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

The Open Microscopy Environment (OME) is an open-source software project that develops tools that enable access, analysis, visualization, sharing and publication of biological image data.

OME has three components:

  • OME-TIFF, standardised file format and data model;
  • Bio-Formats, a software library for reading proprietary image file formats; and
  • OMERO, a software platform for image data management and analysis.

In this one day course, we will present the OMERO platform, and show how to import, organise, view, search, annotate and publish imaging data. Additionally, we will briefly introduce how to use a variety of processing tools with OMERO.

This course is organized alongside a one day course on Biological Imaging Data Processing for Data Scientists. More information on this event are available here.

This course will be delivered by members of the OMERO team. The OME project is supported by BBSRC and Wellcome Trust.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

CRUK: Analysis of publicly available microarray data Mon 20 Feb 2017   09:30 Finished

Although microarrays have been superseded by high-throughput sequencing technologies for gene expression profiling, years of experience gained from analysing microarray data has led to a variety of analysis techniques and datasets that can be exploited in other contexts. In this course, we will focus on retrieving and exploring microarray data from public repositories such as Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO).

Course materials can be found here.

This event is part of a series of training courses organized in collaboration with Dr. Mark Dunning at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

CRUK: Managing your Research Data Thu 28 Nov 2019   12:30 Finished

How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen? Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'? Have you ever struggled to import your spreadsheets into R? Would you be able to write a Data Management Plan as part of a grant proposal?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications. Whether you create, receive or collect data, you will certainly need to organise it at some stage of your project. This workshop will provide an overview of some basic principles on how we can work with data more effectively. We will discuss the best practices for research data management and organisation so that our research is auditable and reproducible by ourselves, and others, in the future.

Course materials are available here

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

CRUK: Image Analysis with Fiji Mon 23 Mar 2020   12:30 Finished

Fiji/ImageJ is a popular open-source image analysis software application. This course will briefly cover introductory aspects of image processing and analysis theory, but will focus on practical sessions where participants will gain hands on experience with Fiji.

This course is run by the CRUK CI Light microscopy core facility.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

This course has the following objectives:

  • To provide an overview on the importance of microscopy image analysis and tools in Arivis Vision4D software for the quantification of various biological problems: cell analysis, time-lapse, colocalization, stitching, handle large images etc
  • Practical session with computers during which participants will be introduced to image analysis and visualization using Vision4D
  • Demonstration on how virtual reality can help with image visualization and quantification

This course is run by the CRUK CI Light microscopy core facility.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Galaxy is an open, web-based platform for data-intensive life science research that enables non-bioinformaticians to create, run, tune, and share their own bioinformatic analyses.

A Galaxy introduction course covering basic functions, simple data manipulation using use cases and examples and visualisation mostly targeted at first time users.

Further information is available from the course website.

This event is part of a series of training courses organised in collaboration with Dr. Mark Dunning at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book by linking here.

EMBL-EBI: Network Analysis with Cytoscape and PSICQUIC Wed 22 May 2019   09:30 Finished

This module provides an introduction to the theory and concepts of network analysis. Attendees will learn how to construct protein-protein interaction networks and subsequently use these to analyse large-scale datasets generated these to by techniques such as RNA-Seq or mass-spec proteomics. The course will focus on giving attendees hands-on experience in the use of Cytoscape and selected network analysis apps.

Also note: This event is part of a series of short introductions focusing on EMBL-EBI resources. If you want to learn more about these separate training events, see the Related Courses section below.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

This course provides an introduction to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) data analysis methodologies. Lectures will give insight into how biological knowledge can be generated from RNA-seq, ChIP-seq and DNA-seq experiments and illustrate different ways of analyzing such data. Practicals will consist of computer exercises that will enable the participants to apply statistical methods to the analysis of RNA-seq, ChIP-seq and DNA-seq data under the guidance of the lecturers and teaching assistants. It is aimed at researchers who are applying or planning to apply HTS technologies and bioinformatics methods in their research.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Ensembl REST API workshop Wed 2 Sep 2020   09:30 [Places]

The Ensembl project provides a comprehensive and integrated source of annotation of mainly vertebrate genome sequences.

This workshop is aimed at researchers and developers interested in exploring Ensembl beyond the website. The workshop covers how to use the Ensembl REST APIs, including understanding the major endpoints and how to write scripts to call them.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

PLEASE NOTE that until further notice, due to the evolving situation with Coronavirus no courses will be offered as classroom based at the Training Facility. The Bioinformatics Team be teaching the course live online, with tutors available to help you work through the course material on a personal copy of the course environment. We will be aiming to simulate the classroom experience as closely as possible, with opportunities for one-to-one discussion with tutors and a focus on interactivity throughout.

This two days course will focus on the theory and applications of metagenomics, for the analysis of complex microbiomes (microbial communities). The course will include theoretical (~40%) and practical (~60%) training. We will start with the fastest, simplest and cheapest amplicon based methods and will go up to the Hi-C metagenomics methods that give highly detailed results on the complex microbial communities. The practical component will cover bioinformatics analysis of metagenomics.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Image Analysis for Biologists Mon 11 Dec 2017   09:30 Finished

This course will focus on computational methods for analysing cellular images and extracting quantitative data from them. The aim of this course is to familiarise the participants with computational image analysis methodologies, and to provide hands-on training in running quantitative analysis pipelines.

On day 1 we will introduce principles of image processing and analysis, giving an overview of commonly used algorithms through a series of talks and practicals based on Fiji, an extensible open source software package.

On day 2, we will cover time series processing and cell tracking using TrackMate. The afternoon of day two will focus on understanding the basics of deconvolution and colocalisation, using tools in Fiji to look at basic examples of how to apply deconvolution and how to carry out colocalisation analysis in fluorescence microscopy.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Image Analysis for Biologists Mon 24 Jun 2019   09:30 Finished

This course will focus on computational methods for analysing cellular images and extracting quantitative data from them. The aim of this course is to familiarise the participants with computational image analysis methodologies, and to provide hands-on training in running quantitative analysis pipelines.

On day 1 we will introduce principles of image processing and analysis, giving an overview of commonly used algorithms through a series of talks and practicals based on Fiji, an extensible open source software package.

On day 2, we will cover time series processing and cell tracking using TrackMate and advanced image segmentation using Ilastik. Additionally, in the afternoon we will run a study design and data clinic (sign up will be required) for participants that wish to discuss their experiments.

On day 3, we will describe the open Icy platform developed at the Institut Pasteur. Icy is a next-generation, user-friendly software offering powerful acquisition, visualisation, annotation and analysis algorithms for 5D bioimaging data, together with unique automation/scripting capabilities (notably via its graphical programming interface) and tight integration with existing software (e.g. ImageJ, Matlab, Micro-Manager).

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Image Processing and Visualisation with LithoGraphX new Thu 4 Aug 2016   10:00 Finished

LithoGraphX is a software to visualize, process and analyse 3D images and meshes.

On the first day of this course, we will demonstrate how to use LithoGraphX to visualize, clean and process 2D and 3D images. We will cover: (i) how to extract cell shape from 2D or 3D images by marking the cell wall or membrane, (ii) how to extract key morphological features and (iii) how to use these features to build a cell classifier. The first day is intended for biologists and computer scientists interested in using LithoGraphX.

On the second day, we will see how to write and distribute extensions to LithoGraphX. To this purpose, we will learn more about the internals of LithoGraphX and its API both in C++ and Python. The second day is intended for computer scientists wanting either to write their own algorithm or automate complex protocols.

Participants can choose to register for both days or for individual days, depending on their interest and background knowledge.

The timetable for this event can be found here.

This course is organized in collaboration with Dr Susana Sauret-Gueto from the OpenPlant Lab of the Department of Plant Sciences of the University of Cambridge.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Galaxy (http://galaxyproject.org/) is an open, web-based platform for data intensive life science research that enables non-bioinformaticians to create, run, tune, and share bioinformatic analyses. The goal of this course is to demonstrate how to use Galaxy to explore RNA-seq data, for expression profiling, and ChIP-seq data, to assess genomic DNA binding sites. You will learn how to perform analysis in Galaxy, and then how to share, repeat, and reproduce your analyses.

The timetable for this event can be found here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book by linking here.

Introduction to genome variation analysis using NGS Thu 18 May 2017   09:30 Finished

This course provides an introduction to the analysis of human genome sequence variation with next generation sequencing data (NGS), including:

  • an introduction to genetic variation as well as data formats and analysis workflows commonly used in NGS data analysis;
  • an overview of available analytical tools and discussion of their limitations; and
  • hands-on experience with common computational workflows for analysing genome sequence variation using bioinformatics and computational genomics approaches.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Introduction to RNA-seq and ChIP-seq data analysis Wed 25 Oct 2017   09:30 Finished

The aim of this course is to familiarize the participants with the primary analysis of datasets generated through two popular high-throughput sequencing (HTS) assays: ChIP-seq and RNA-seq.

This course starts with a brief introduction to the transition from capillary to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) and discusses quality control issues, which are common among all HTS datasets. Next, we will present the alignment step and how it differs between the two analysis workflows. Finally, we focus on dataset specific downstream analysis, including peak calling and motif analysis for ChIP-seq and quantification of expression, transcriptome assembly and differential expression analysis for RNA-seq.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Introduction to Scientific Figure Design Fri 11 Oct 2019   09:30 Finished

This course provides a practical guide to producing figures for use in reports and publications.

It is a wide ranging course which looks at how to design figures to clearly and fairly represent your data, the practical aspects of graph creation, the allowable manipulation of bitmap images and compositing and editing of final figures.

The course will use a number of different open source software packages and is illustrated with a number of example figures adapted from common analysis tools.

Further information and access to the course materials is here.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

CRUK: Experimental Design Mon 28 Oct 2019   10:00 Finished

Modern technologies are able to deliver an unprecedented amount of data rapidly. However, without due care and attention early in the experimental process, such data are meaningless if they cannot adequately answer the intended research question. This course is aimed at those planning high-throughput experiments and highlights the kinds of questions they should be asking themselves. The course consists of a lecture and small-group discussions led by a member of the Genomics or Bioinformatics Cores.

This event is part of a series of training courses organized in collaboration with the Bioinformatics Core Facility at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

PLEASE NOTE that until further notice, due to the evolving situation with Coronavirus no courses will be offered as classroom based at the Training Facility. The Bioinformatics Team are investigating a workable solution to offer some of the courses on a remote basis and will be in contact with updates as soon as possible.

This course will provide training for bench-based biologists to use molecular data to construct and interpret phylogenies, and test their hypotheses. Delegates will gain hands-on practice of using a variety of programs freely-available online and commonly used in molecular studies, interspersed with some lectures.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Network Visualisation and Analysis of Biological Data new Thu 14 Apr 2016   09:30 Finished

This two day course will cover network-based approaches to visualise and analyse complex biological ‘big’ data and model pathway systems. The course will be centred on the use of BioLayout Express3D, a tool developed between scientists at the University of Edinburgh and EBI over the last 10 years.

BioLayout provides rapid and versatile means to explore and integrate very large datasets, providing a stunning interface to visualise the relationships between 10’s of2000 :30 Finished

This two day course will cover network-based approaches to visualise and analyse complex biological ‘big’ data and model pathway systems. The course will be centred on the use of BioLayout Express3D, a tool developed between scientists at the University of Edinburgh and EBI over the last 10 years.

BioLayout provides rapid and versatile means to explore and integrate very large datasets, providing a stunning interface to visualise the relationships between 10’s of thousands of data points. Originally designed for the analysis of microarray data, it is equally effective in analysing data matrices from other analysis platforms.

Day one of the course will introduce principles of network analysis and their use as a generic medium to understand relationships between entities. We will introduce the basics of network visualisation and navigation within BioLayout and principles of correlation analysis of data matrices. We will then explore how data can be explored and clustered within the tool and how you can use the software to rapidly extract meaning from large and complex datasets.

Day two will focus on pathway modelling. We will explain how to collate information about a given system of interest from the literature, and to turn this information into a logic-based pathway model. We will then explore how these models can be parametrised and imported into BioLayout where simulations can be run that model the dynamics of these systems under different conditions. For more information see: http://www.virtuallyimmune.org/

A draft agenda can be found here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Next Generation Sequencing data analysis Tue 17 Mar 2015   09:00 Finished

This course provides an introduction to next generation sequencing (NGS) data analysis methodologies. Lectures will give insight into how biological knowledge can be generated from RNA-seq, ChIP-seq and DNA-seq experiments and illustrate different ways of analyzing such data. Practicals will consist of computer exercises that will enable the participants to apply statistical methods to the analysis of RNA-seq, ChIP-seq and DNA-seq data under the guidance of the lecturers and teaching assistants. It is aimed at researchers who are applying or planning to apply NGS technologies and bioinformatics methods in their research.

The timetable for this event can be found here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

  • Nowomics - Access to the latest data and papers relevant to your research