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Bioinformatics Training

Bioinformatics course timetable

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Mon 16 Apr – Thu 19 Jul

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April 2018

Mon 16
Data Carpentry in R (1 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

In many domains of research the rapid generation of large amounts of data is fundamentally changing how research is done. The deluge of data presents great opportunities, but also many challenges in managing, analyzing and sharing data.

Data Carpentry workshops are designed to teach basic concepts, skills and tools for working more effectively with data, using a combination of tools with a main focus in R. The workshop is aimed at researchers in the life sciences at all career stages and is designed for learners with little to no prior knowledge of programming, shell scripting, or command line tools.

This course is organized in collaboration with ElixirUK and the Software Sustainability Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Tue 17
Data Carpentry in R (2 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

In many domains of research the rapid generation of large amounts of data is fundamentally changing how research is done. The deluge of data presents great opportunities, but also many challenges in managing, analyzing and sharing data.

Data Carpentry workshops are designed to teach basic concepts, skills and tools for working more effectively with data, using a combination of tools with a main focus in R. The workshop is aimed at researchers in the life sciences at all career stages and is designed for learners with little to no prior knowledge of programming, shell scripting, or command line tools.

This course is organized in collaboration with ElixirUK and the Software Sustainability Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Wed 18
Molecular Phylogenetics (1 of 3) [Places] 09:00 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course will provide training for bench-based biologists to use molecular data to construct and interpret phylogenies, and test their hypotheses. Delegates will gain hands-on practice of using a variety of programs freely-available online and commonly used in molecular studies, interspersed with some lectures.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Thu 19
Molecular Phylogenetics (2 of 3) [Places] 09:00 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course will provide training for bench-based biologists to use molecular data to construct and interpret phylogenies, and test their hypotheses. Delegates will gain hands-on practice of using a variety of programs freely-available online and commonly used in molecular studies, interspersed with some lectures.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Fri 20
Molecular Phylogenetics (3 of 3) [Places] 09:00 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course will provide training for bench-based biologists to use molecular data to construct and interpret phylogenies, and test their hypotheses. Delegates will gain hands-on practice of using a variety of programs freely-available online and commonly used in molecular studies, interspersed with some lectures.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

May 2018

Tue 1
An Introduction to Machine Learning new (1 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

Machine learning gives computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed. It encompasses a broad range of approaches to data analysis with applicability across the biological sciences. Lectures will introduce commonly used algorithms and provide insight into their theoretical underpinnings. In the practicals students will apply these algorithms to real biological data-sets using the R language and environment.

Please be aware that the course syllabus is currently being updated following feedback from the last event; therefore the agenda below will be subjected to changes.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Wed 2
An Introduction to Machine Learning new (2 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

Machine learning gives computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed. It encompasses a broad range of approaches to data analysis with applicability across the biological sciences. Lectures will introduce commonly used algorithms and provide insight into their theoretical underpinnings. In the practicals students will apply these algorithms to real biological data-sets using the R language and environment.

Please be aware that the course syllabus is currently being updated following feedback from the last event; therefore the agenda below will be subjected to changes.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Wed 16
Statistical Analysis using R [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

Statistics are an important part of most modern studies and being able to effectively use a statistical package will help you to understand your results.

This course provides an introduction to some statistical techniques through the use of the R language. Topics covered include: Chi2 and Fisher tests, descriptive statistics, t-test, analysis of variance and regression.

Students will run analyses using statistical and graphical skills taught during the session.

The course manual can be found here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Wed 23
Data Analysis and Visualisation in R [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course introduces some relatively new additions to the R programming language: dplyr and ggplot2. In combination these R packages provide a powerful toolkit to make the process of manipulating and visualising data easy and intuitive.

Materials for this course can be found here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Thu 24
Protein Structure Analysis new (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course covers data resources and analytical approaches for the discovery and interpretation of biomacromolecular structures.

Day 1 focuses on public repositories of structural data (Protein Data Bank and Electron Microscopy Data Bank) and resources for protein analysis and classification (Pfam, InterPro and HMMER).

Day 2 covers how to find information about the structure and function of your protein sequence using CATH, principles of modern state-of-the-art protein modelling with Phyre2 and methods for predicting the effects of mutations on protein structure and function using the SAAP family of tools.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Fri 25
Protein Structure Analysis new (2 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course covers data resources and analytical approaches for the discovery and interpretation of biomacromolecular structures.

Day 1 focuses on public repositories of structural data (Protein Data Bank and Electron Microscopy Data Bank) and resources for protein analysis and classification (Pfam, InterPro and HMMER).

Day 2 covers how to find information about the structure and function of your protein sequence using CATH, principles of modern state-of-the-art protein modelling with Phyre2 and methods for predicting the effects of mutations on protein structure and function using the SAAP family of tools.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

June 2018

Fri 1
Big Data and Cloud Computing new [Places] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

Recent advances in genomics, proteomics, imaging and other technologies, have resulted in data being generated at a faster rate than they can be meaningfully analysed. In this course we will show you how cloud computing can be used to meet the challenges of storage, management and analysis of big data. The first half of the course will introduce cloud infrastructure technologies. The second half will cover tools for collaborative working, resource management, and creation of workflows. The instructors will demonstrate how they are using cloud computing in their own research.

N.B. If you sign up for this course, you will be automatically registered for an AWS educate account, which will provide you with sufficient AWS credits to complete the course exercises. If you decide to continue using cloud computing after the course, you will need to either purchase more credits or apply for a grant from programs like: AWS Cloud Credits for Research, Microsoft Azure for Research or Google Cloud Platform Education Grants.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Wed 13
Introduction to Scientific Figure Design [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course provides a practical guide to producing figures for use in reports and publications.

It is a wide ranging course which looks at how to design figures to clearly and fairly represent your data, the practical aspects of graph creation, the allowable manipulation of bitmap images and compositing and editing of final figures.

The course will use a number of different open source software packages and is illustrated with a number of example figures adapted from common analysis tools.

Further information and access to the course materials is here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Wed 27
Analysis of DNA Methylation using Sequencing [Places] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course will cover all aspects of the analysis of DNA methylation using sequencing, including primary analysis, mapping and quality control of BS-Seq data, common pitfalls and complications.

It will also include exploratory analysis of methylation, looking at different methods of quantitation, and a variety of ways of looking more widely at the distribution of methylation over the genome. Finally the course will look at statistical methods to predict differential methylation.

The course will be comprised of a mixture of theoretical lectures and practicals covering a range of different software packages.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

July 2018

Mon 2
An introduction to metabolomics and its application in life-sciences (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

The goal of metabolomics is to identify and quantify the complete biochemical composition of a biological sample. With the increase in genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic information there is a growing need to understand the metabolic phenotype that these genes and proteins ultimately control.

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of metabolomics and its applications in life sciences, clinical and environmental settings. Over 2 days we will introduce different techniques used to extract metabolites and analyse samples to collect metabolomic data (such as HPLC or GC-based MS and NMR), present how to analyse such data, how to identify metabolites using online databases and how to map the metabolomic data to metabolic pathways.

The course content will predominantly be based on analysing samples from model plant species such as Arabidopsis thaliana but the procedures are transferable to all other organisms, including clinical and environmental settings.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Tue 3
An introduction to metabolomics and its application in life-sciences (2 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 18:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

The goal of metabolomics is to identify and quantify the complete biochemical composition of a biological sample. With the increase in genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic information there is a growing need to understand the metabolic phenotype that these genes and proteins ultimately control.

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of metabolomics and its applications in life sciences, clinical and environmental settings. Over 2 days we will introduce different techniques used to extract metabolites and analyse samples to collect metabolomic data (such as HPLC or GC-based MS and NMR), present how to analyse such data, how to identify metabolites using online databases and how to map the metabolomic data to metabolic pathways.

The course content will predominantly be based on analysing samples from model plant species such as Arabidopsis thaliana but the procedures are transferable to all other organisms, including clinical and environmental settings.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Fri 6
R object-oriented programming and package development [Places] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

The course will teach intermediate R object-oriented programming and how to build a fully functional R package.

The course page includes slides and handouts; other relevant teaching materials are available here and the sequences example package used as template in the course can be found here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Mon 16
Variant Discovery with GATK4 (1 of 4) [Places] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This workshop will focus on the core steps involved in calling variants with the Broad’s Genome Analysis Toolkit, using the “Best Practices” developed by the GATK team. You will learn why each step is essential to the variant discovery process, what are the operations performed on the data at each step, and how to use the GATK tools to get the most accurate and reliable results out of your dataset.

In the course of this workshop, we highlight key functionalities such as the germline GVCF workflow for joint variant discovery in cohorts, somatic variant discovery using MuTect2, and copy number variation discovery using GATK-CNV. All analyses are demonstrated using GATK version 4. Finally, we demonstrate the use of pipelining tools to assemble and execute GATK workflows.

The workshop covers basic genomics, all currently supported Best Practices pipelines as well as pipelining with WDL/Cromwell/FireCloud. This includes the logic of the major pipelines, file formats and data transformations involved, and hands-on operation of the tools using goal-oriented exercises.

  • Day 1: Introduction to Genomics, GATK Best Practices and Pipelining
  • Day 2: Germline short variant discovery (SNPs + Indels)
  • Day 3: Somatic variant discovery (SNVs + Indels + CNVs)
  • Day 4: Writing pipelines with WDL and running them in FireCloud

Please note that this workshop is focused on human data analysis. The majority of the materials presented does apply equally to non-human data, and we will address some questions regarding adaptations that are needed for analysis of non-human data, but we will not go into much detail on those points.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Tue 17
Variant Discovery with GATK4 (2 of 4) [Places] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This workshop will focus on the core steps involved in calling variants with the Broad’s Genome Analysis Toolkit, using the “Best Practices” developed by the GATK team. You will learn why each step is essential to the variant discovery process, what are the operations performed on the data at each step, and how to use the GATK tools to get the most accurate and reliable results out of your dataset.

In the course of this workshop, we highlight key functionalities such as the germline GVCF workflow for joint variant discovery in cohorts, somatic variant discovery using MuTect2, and copy number variation discovery using GATK-CNV. All analyses are demonstrated using GATK version 4. Finally, we demonstrate the use of pipelining tools to assemble and execute GATK workflows.

The workshop covers basic genomics, all currently supported Best Practices pipelines as well as pipelining with WDL/Cromwell/FireCloud. This includes the logic of the major pipelines, file formats and data transformations involved, and hands-on operation of the tools using goal-oriented exercises.

  • Day 1: Introduction to Genomics, GATK Best Practices and Pipelining
  • Day 2: Germline short variant discovery (SNPs + Indels)
  • Day 3: Somatic variant discovery (SNVs + Indels + CNVs)
  • Day 4: Writing pipelines with WDL and running them in FireCloud

Please note that this workshop is focused on human data analysis. The majority of the materials presented does apply equally to non-human data, and we will address some questions regarding adaptations that are needed for analysis of non-human data, but we will not go into much detail on those points.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Wed 18
Variant Discovery with GATK4 (3 of 4) [Places] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This workshop will focus on the core steps involved in calling variants with the Broad’s Genome Analysis Toolkit, using the “Best Practices” developed by the GATK team. You will learn why each step is essential to the variant discovery process, what are the operations performed on the data at each step, and how to use the GATK tools to get the most accurate and reliable results out of your dataset.

In the course of this workshop, we highlight key functionalities such as the germline GVCF workflow for joint variant discovery in cohorts, somatic variant discovery using MuTect2, and copy number variation discovery using GATK-CNV. All analyses are demonstrated using GATK version 4. Finally, we demonstrate the use of pipelining tools to assemble and execute GATK workflows.

The workshop covers basic genomics, all currently supported Best Practices pipelines as well as pipelining with WDL/Cromwell/FireCloud. This includes the logic of the major pipelines, file formats and data transformations involved, and hands-on operation of the tools using goal-oriented exercises.

  • Day 1: Introduction to Genomics, GATK Best Practices and Pipelining
  • Day 2: Germline short variant discovery (SNPs + Indels)
  • Day 3: Somatic variant discovery (SNVs + Indels + CNVs)
  • Day 4: Writing pipelines with WDL and running them in FireCloud

Please note that this workshop is focused on human data analysis. The majority of the materials presented does apply equally to non-human data, and we will address some questions regarding adaptations that are needed for analysis of non-human data, but we will not go into much detail on those points.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Thu 19
Variant Discovery with GATK4 (4 of 4) [Places] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This workshop will focus on the core steps involved in calling variants with the Broad’s Genome Analysis Toolkit, using the “Best Practices” developed by the GATK team. You will learn why each step is essential to the variant discovery process, what are the operations performed on the data at each step, and how to use the GATK tools to get the most accurate and reliable results out of your dataset.

In the course of this workshop, we highlight key functionalities such as the germline GVCF workflow for joint variant discovery in cohorts, somatic variant discovery using MuTect2, and copy number variation discovery using GATK-CNV. All analyses are demonstrated using GATK version 4. Finally, we demonstrate the use of pipelining tools to assemble and execute GATK workflows.

The workshop covers basic genomics, all currently supported Best Practices pipelines as well as pipelining with WDL/Cromwell/FireCloud. This includes the logic of the major pipelines, file formats and data transformations involved, and hands-on operation of the tools using goal-oriented exercises.

  • Day 1: Introduction to Genomics, GATK Best Practices and Pipelining
  • Day 2: Germline short variant discovery (SNPs + Indels)
  • Day 3: Somatic variant discovery (SNVs + Indels + CNVs)
  • Day 4: Writing pipelines with WDL and running them in FireCloud

Please note that this workshop is focused on human data analysis. The majority of the materials presented does apply equally to non-human data, and we will address some questions regarding adaptations that are needed for analysis of non-human data, but we will not go into much detail on those points.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.